Duchy of Luxemburg

The Duchy of Luxemburg (Dutch: Luxemburg; French: Luxembourg; German: Luxemburg; Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuerg) was a state of the Holy Roman Empire, the ancestral homeland of the noble House of Luxembourg. The House of Luxembourg, now Duke of Limburg, became one of the most important political forces in the 14th century, competing against the House of Habsburg for supremacy in Central Europe. They would be the heirs to the Přemyslid dynasty in the Kingdom of Bohemia, succeeding the Kingdom of Hungary and contributing four Holy Roman Emperors until their own line of male heirs came to an end and the House of Habsburg got the pieces that the two Houses had originally agreed upon in the Treaty of Brünn in 1364.

Duchy of Luxemburg
Herzogtum Lëtzebuerg (lb)
Herzogtum Luxemburg (de)
Duché de Luxembourg (fr)
Hertogdom Luxemburg (nl)
Ducatus Luxemburgensis (la)
1353–1797
The County of Luxembourg in 1350
StatusState of the Holy Roman Empire
Part of the Burgundian Netherlands (1443–1482)
Part of the Habsburg Netherlands (1482–1581)
Part of the Spanish Netherlands (1581–1714)
Part of the Austrian Netherlands (1714–1795)
CapitalLuxembourg
Common languagesLuxembourgish, German, French
Religion
Roman Catholicism
GovernmentFeudal Duchy
Duke of Luxemburg 
 1353–1383
Wenceslaus I (first)
 1415–1419
Elizabeth of Görlitz
 1419–1425
John the Fearless
 1425–1443
Elizabeth of Gorlitz (last)
 1439–1482
William III of Saxony (claimant)
Historical eraMiddle Ages
 Obtained by Sigfried
963
 Acquired by Luxembourg dynasty
1059
 Raised to county
1214
 Raised to duchy by the Emperor
1353
 Held by the Dukes of Burgundy
1443
 To Habsburg
1482
 Occupied by France
1797
ISO 3166 codeLU
Preceded by
Succeeded by
County of Luxemburg
Vianden
French First Republic
History of the Low Countries
Frisii Belgae
Cana-
nefates
Chamavi,
Tubantes

Gallia Belgica (55 BC – 5th c. AD)
Germania Inferior (83 – 5th c.)
Salian Franks Batavi
unpopulated
(4th–5th c.)
Saxons Salian Franks
(4th–5th c.)
Frisian Kingdom
(6th c.–734)
Frankish Kingdom (481–843)Carolingian Empire (800–843)
Austrasia (511–687)
Middle Francia (843–855) West
Francia

(843–)
Kingdom of Lotharingia (855– 959)
Duchy of Lower Lorraine (959–)
Frisia


Frisian
Freedom

(11–16th
century)

County of
Holland

(880–1432)

Bishopric of
Utrecht

(695–1456)

Duchy of
Brabant

(1183–1430)

Duchy of
Guelders

(1046–1543)

County of
Flanders

(862–1384)

County of
Hainaut

(1071–1432)

County of
Namur

(981–1421)

P.-Bish.
of Liège


(980–1794)

Duchy of
Luxem-
bourg

(1059–1443)
 
Burgundian Netherlands (1384–1482)

Habsburg Netherlands (1482–1795)
(Seventeen Provinces after 1543)
 

Dutch Republic
(1581–1795)

Spanish Netherlands
(1556–1714)
 
 
Austrian Netherlands
(1714–1795)
 
United States of Belgium
(1790)

R. Liège
(1789–'91)
     

Batavian Republic (1795–1806)
Kingdom of Holland (1806–1810)

associated with French First Republic (1795–1804)
part of First French Empire (1804–1815)
   

Princip. of the Netherlands (1813–1815)
 
United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815–1830)
Gr D. L.
(1815–)


Kingdom of the Netherlands (1839–)

Kingdom of Belgium (1830–)
Gr D. of
Luxem-
bourg

(1890–)

In 1443, the duchy passed to Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy of the French House of Valois, and, in 1477, by marriage to Archduke Maximilian I of Austria of the House of Habsburg. The Seventeen Provinces of the former Burgundian Netherlands were formed into an integral union by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in the Pragmatic Sanction of 1549. In 1795, French revolutionaries ended this situation.


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