Euphonium

The euphonium is a medium-sized, 3 or 4-valve, often compensating, conical-bore, tenor-voiced brass instrument that derives its name from the Ancient Greek word εὔφωνος euphōnos,[1] meaning "well-sounding" or "sweet-voiced" (εὖ eu means "well" or "good" and φωνή phōnē means "sound", hence "of good sound"). The euphonium is a valved instrument. Nearly all current models have piston valves, though some models with rotary valves do exist.

Euphonium
Brass instrument
Classification

Wind, brass

Aerophone
Hornbostel–Sachs classification423.232
(Valved aerophone sounded by lip movement)
Developed1840s from the ophicleide
Playing range
(A1) B1–E5 (A5)
This image represents the range for the instrument as it is commonly played.
Related instruments

The euphonium may be played in bass clef as a non-transposing instrument or in treble clef as a transposing instrument. In British brass bands, it is typically treated as a treble-clef instrument, while in American band music, parts may be written in either treble clef or bass clef, or both.