First Continental Congress

The First Continental Congress was a meeting of delegates from 12 of the 13 British colonies that became the United States. It met from September 5 to October 26, 1774, at Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, after the British Navy instituted a blockade of Boston Harbor and Parliament passed the punitive Intolerable Acts in response to the December 1773 Boston Tea Party.[1] During the opening weeks of the Congress, the delegates conducted a spirited discussion about how the colonies could collectively respond to the British government's coercive actions, and they worked to make a common cause.

First Continental Congress
Type
Type
History
EstablishedSeptember 5, 1774
DisbandedOctober 26, 1774
Preceded byStamp Act Congress
Succeeded bySecond Continental Congress
Leadership
President
Peyton Randolph
  (through October 22, 1774)
Henry Middleton
Secretary
Seats56 from 12 of the 13 colonies
Meeting place
Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia

A plan was proposed to create a Union of Great Britain and the Colonies, but the delegates rejected it. They ultimately agreed in the Continental Association to impose an economic boycott on British trade, and they drew up a Petition to the King pleading for redress of their grievances and repeal of the Intolerable Acts. That appeal had no effect, so the colonies convened the Second Continental Congress the following May, shortly after the battles of Lexington and Concord, to organize the defense of the colonies at the outset of the Revolutionary War. The delegates also urged each colony to set up and train its own militia.