Fluoride

Fluoride (/ˈflʊərd, ˈflɔːr-/)[3] is an inorganic, monatomic anion of fluorine, with the chemical formula F
(also written [F]
), whose salts are typically white or colorless. Fluoride salts typically have distinctive bitter tastes, and are odorless. Its salts and minerals are important chemical reagents and industrial chemicals, mainly used in the production of hydrogen fluoride for fluorocarbons. Fluoride is classified as a weak base since it only partially associates in solution, but concentrated fluoride is corrosive and can attack the skin.

Fluoride
Names
IUPAC name
Fluoride[1]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
14905
KEGG
MeSH Fluoride
UNII
  • InChI=1S/FH/h1H/p-1 Y
    Key: KRHYYFGTRYWZRS-UHFFFAOYSA-M Y
  • [F-]
Properties
F
Molar mass 18.998403163 g·mol−1
Conjugate acid Hydrogen fluoride
Thermochemistry
145.58 J/mol K (gaseous)[2]
−333 kJ mol−1
Related compounds
Other anions
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Fluoride is the simplest fluorine anion. In terms of charge and size, the fluoride ion resembles the hydroxide ion. Fluoride ions occur on Earth in several minerals, particularly fluorite, but are present only in trace quantities in bodies of water in nature.


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