Fons van der Stee


Alphonsus Petrus Johannes Mathildus Maria "Fons" van der Stee (30 July 1928 – 9 September 1999) was a Dutch politician of the defunct Catholic People's Party (KVP) and later the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) party and economist.[1]

Fons van der Stee
Fons van der Stee in 1979
Minister of Finance
In office
5 March 1980  4 November 1982
Prime MinisterDries van Agt
Preceded byGijs van Aardenne (Ad interim)
Succeeded byOnno Ruding
Minister for Netherlands Antilles Affairs
In office
19 December 1977  11 September 1981
Prime MinisterDries van Agt
Preceded byGaius de Gaay Fortman
Succeeded byJoop den Uyl
Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries
In office
1 November 1973  5 March 1980
Prime MinisterJoop den Uyl (1973–1977)
Dries van Agt (1977–1980)
Preceded byTiemen Brouwer
Succeeded byGerrit Braks
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
8 June 1977  8 September 1977
In office
12 December 1972  11 May 1973
Parliamentary groupCatholic People's Party
State Secretary for Finance
In office
11 May 1973  1 November 1973
Serving with Aar de Goede
Prime MinisterJoop den Uyl
Preceded byHimself
Succeeded byMartin van Rooijen
In office
14 July 1971  12 March 1973
Serving with Willem Scholten
Prime MinisterBarend Biesheuvel
Preceded byFerd Grapperhaus
Succeeded byHimself
Member of the Senate
In office
11 May 1971  14 July 1971
Parliamentary groupCatholic People's Party
Chairman of the Catholic
People's Party
In office
30 March 1968  14 July 1971
LeaderNorbert Schmelzer (1968–1971)
Gerard Veringa (1971)
Preceded byPiet Aalberse Jr.
Succeeded byDick de Zeeuw
Personal details
Born
Alphonsus Petrus Johannes Mathildus Maria van der Stee

(1928-07-30)30 July 1928
Zevenbergen, Netherlands
Died9 September 1999(1999-09-09) (aged 71)
The Hague, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyChristian Democratic Appeal
(from 1980)
Other political
affiliations
Catholic People's Party
(until 1980)
Spouse(s)
Tonny Kramers
(m. 1957; died 1993)
Alma materRadboud University Nijmegen
(Bachelor of Laws, Master of Laws)
OccupationPolitician · Jurist · Economist · Financial adviser · Tax advisor · Businessman · Corporate director · Nonprofit director · Lobbyist

Van der Stee applied at the Radboud University Nijmegen in June 1950 majoring in Tax law and obtaining an Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1952 before graduating with an Master of Laws degree on 29 February 1956. Van der Stee worked as a tax advisor in Arnhem from May 1956 until July 1971. Van der Stee served as Chairman of the Catholic People's Party from 30 March 1968 until 14 July 1971. Van der Stee was elected as a Member of the Senate after the Senate election of 1971, taking office on 11 May 1971.

After the election of 1971 Van der Stee was appointed as State Secretary for Finance in the Cabinet Biesheuvel I, taking office on 14 July 1971. The Cabinet Biesheuvel I fell just one year later on 19 July 1972 and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced by the caretaker Cabinet Biesheuvel II with Van der Stee continuing as State Secretary for Finance, taking office on 9 August 1972. Van der Stee was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives after the election of 1972, taking office on 12 December 1972 but he was still serving in the cabinet and because of dualism customs in the constitutional convention of Dutch politics he couldn't serve a dual mandate he subsequently resigned as State Secretary for Finance on 12 March 1973. Following the cabinet formation of 1972 Van der Stee was again appointed as State Secretary for Finance in the Cabinet Den Uyl, taking office on 11 May 1973. Van der Stee was appointed as Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries following the resignation of Tiemen Brouwer, taking office on 1 November 1973. The Cabinet Den Uyl fell on 22 March 1977 after four years of tensions in the coalition and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity. After the election of 1977 Van der Stee returned as a Member of the House of Representatives, taking office on 8 June 1977 but again because of the dualism customs in Dutch politics he subsequently resigned as Member of the House of Representatives on 8 September 1977. Following the cabinet formation of 1977 Van der Stee remained Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and was also appointed as Minister for Netherlands Antilles Affairs in the Cabinet Van Agt–Wiegel, taking office on 19 December 1977. Van der Stee was appointed as Minister of Finance following the resignation of Frans Andriessen, taking office on 5 March 1980. In December 1980 Van der Stee announced that he wouldn't stand for the election of 1981. Following the cabinet formation of 1981 Van der Stee continued as Minister of Finance in the Cabinet Van Agt II, taking office on 11 September 1981. The Cabinet Van Agt II fell just seven months into its term on 12 May 1982 and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced by the caretaker Cabinet Van Agt III with Van der Stee remaining as Minister of Finance on 29 May 1982. In June 1982 Van der Stee announced his retirement from national politics and that he wouldn't stand for the election of 1982. The Cabinet Van Agt III was replaced by the Cabinet Lubbers I following the cabinet formation of 1982 on 4 November 1982.

Van der Stee retired after spending 14 years in national politics and became active in the private sector and public sector and occupied numerous seats as a corporate director and nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards (General Bank of the Netherlands, Tulip Computers, Apollo Vredestein and the HMC Westeinde Hospital).

Decorations


Honours
Ribbon barHonourCountryDateComment
Knight of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre Holy See 11 November 1971
Grand Officer of the Honorary Order of the Palm Suriname
Commander of the Legion of Honour France [2]
Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 9 December 1982

References


  1. "Met Van der Stee was altijd te praten over een 'deal'" (in Dutch). Volkskrant. 10 September 1999. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  2. "Plooibare Van der Stee zat in vijf kabinetten" (in Dutch). Reformatorisch Dagblad. 10 September 1999. Retrieved 28 September 2019.