Frigidaire Building


The Frigidaire Building or Templeton Building is a building in southeast Portland, Oregon listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building was designed by William C. Knighton and Leslie D. Howell and completed in 1929 for O.E. (Oscar) Heintz and occupied by Frigidaire until 1934. When prohibition was repealed in 1933, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission was created through Oregon's Knox Bill. OLCC occupied the building once Frigidare left. Later it was occupied by R.J. Templeton, an auto parts distributor.[2][3][4]

Frigidaire Building
Portland Historic Landmark[1]
Frigidaire Building, billboards, and Burnside Bridge supports in 2011
Location230 E. Burnside Street
Portland, Oregon
Coordinates45°31′22″N 122°39′47″W
Built1929
ArchitectKnighton & Howell
MPSPortland Eastside MPS
NRHP reference No.89000091[2]
Added to NRHPMarch 8, 1989

The building was purchased by Artiste Lofts LLC in 2004 for $800,000. It had been previously owned by Joanne Ferrero.[4] Later, the building contained Disjecta.

As of 2020 the building contains OMFGCO, a creative agency who placed a very visible quote on the building stating "Long live the wildcards, misfits & dabblers".[5]

Further reading


  • K. Zisman; J. Koler; J. Morrison; A. Yost. B Grimala (August 15, 1988). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Frigidaire Building" (pdf). National Park Service. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)

See also


References


  1. Portland Historic Landmarks Commission (July 2010), Historic Landmarks -- Portland, Oregon (XLS), retrieved June 7, 2014.
  2. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  3. "Oregon National Register List" (PDF). Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. October 19, 2009. p. 33. Retrieved June 8, 2011.
  4. Wendy Culverwell (13 August 2004). "Templeton Building sold to investor - Portland Business Journal". Portland Business Journal. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  5. "OMFGCO – OMFGCO Studio". OMFGCO. Retrieved 1 August 2020.