Gallbladder

In vertebrates, the gallbladder, also known as the cholecyst, is a small hollow organ where bile is stored and concentrated before it is released into the small intestine. In humans, the pear-shaped gallbladder lies beneath the liver, although the structure and position of the gallbladder can vary significantly among animal species. It receives and stores bile, produced by the liver, via the common hepatic duct, and releases it via the common bile duct into the duodenum, where the bile helps in the digestion of fats.

Gallbladder
The gallbladder sits beneath the liver.
Details
PrecursorForegut
SystemDigestive system
ArteryCystic artery
VeinCystic vein
NerveCeliac ganglia, Vagus nerve[1]
Identifiers
LatinVesica biliaris, vesica fellea
MeSHD005704
TA98A05.8.02.001
TA23081
FMA7202
Anatomical terminology

The gallbladder can be affected by gallstones, formed by material that cannot be dissolved – usually cholesterol or bilirubin, a product of haemoglobin breakdown. These may cause significant pain, particularly in the upper-right corner of the abdomen, and are often treated with removal of the gallbladder (called a cholecystectomy). Cholecystitis, inflammation of the gallbladder, has a wide range of causes, including result from the impaction of gallstones, infection, and autoimmune disease.


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