Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins SJ (28 July 1844 – 8 June 1889) was an English poet and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame placed him among leading Victorian poets. His manipulation of prosody – notably his concept of sprung rhythm – established him as an innovator, as did his praise of God through vivid use of imagery and nature. Only after his death did Robert Bridges publish a few of Hopkins's mature poems in anthologies, hoping to prepare for wider acceptance of his style. By 1930 Hopkins's work was seen as one of the most original literary accomplishments of his century. It strongly influenced such leading 20th-century poets as T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender and Cecil Day-Lewis.


Gerard Manley Hopkins

ChurchLatin Church
Orders
OrdinationSeptember 1877
Personal details
Born(1844-07-28)28 July 1844
Stratford, Essex, England
Died8 June 1889(1889-06-08) (aged 44)
Dublin, Ireland
BuriedGlasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, Ireland
NationalityBritish
DenominationRoman Catholic
Occupation
  • Poet
  • Jesuit priest
  • academic
EducationHighgate School
Alma materHeythrop College, London
Balliol College, Oxford