Glycerol

Glycerol
Ball-and-stick model of glycerol
Space-filling model of glycerol
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Propane-1,2,3-triol[1]
Other names
Glycerin
Glycerine
Propanetriol
1,2,3-Trihydroxypropane
1,2,3-Propanetriol
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
DrugBank
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.263
E number E422 (thickeners, ...)
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C3H8O3/c4-1-3(6)2-5/h3-6H,1-2H2 Y
    Key: PEDCQBHIVMGVHV-UHFFFAOYSA-N Y
  • InChI=1/C3H8O3/c4-1-3(6)2-5/h3-6H,1-2H2
    Key: PEDCQBHIVMGVHV-UHFFFAOYAF
  • OCC(O)CO
Properties
C3H8O3
Molar mass 92.094 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless hygroscopic liquid
Odor Odorless
Density 1.261 g/cm3
Melting point 17.8 °C (64.0 °F; 290.9 K)
Boiling point 290 °C (554 °F; 563 K)[2]
miscible[3]
log P -2.32[4]
Vapor pressure 0.003 mmHg (50 °C)[3]
-57.06·10−6 cm3/mol
1.4746
Viscosity 1.412 Pa·s (20 °C)[5]
Pharmacology
A06AG04 (WHO) A06AX01 (WHO), QA16QA03 (WHO)
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
1
1
0
Flash point 160 °C (320 °F; 433 K) (closed cup)
176 °C (349 °F; 449 K) (open cup)
NIOSH (US health exposure limits):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 15 mg/m3 (total) TWA 5 mg/m3 (resp)[3]
REL (Recommended)
None established[3]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.[3]
Safety data sheet (SDS) JT Baker
Supplementary data page
Glycerol (data page)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Y verify (what is YN ?)

Glycerol (/ˈɡlɪsərɒl/),[6] also called glycerine in British English and glycerin in American English, is a simple polyol compound. It is a colorless, odorless, viscous liquid that is sweet-tasting and non-toxic. The glycerol backbone is found in lipids known as glycerides. Due to having antimicrobial and antiviral properties it is widely used in FDA approved wound and burn treatments. Conversely, it is also used as a bacterial culture medium.[7] It can be used as an effective marker to measure liver disease. It is also widely used as a sweetener in the food industry and as a humectant in pharmaceutical formulations. Owing to the presence of three hydroxyl groups, glycerol is miscible with water and is hygroscopic in nature.[8]


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Glycerol, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.