Guelders

Guelders or Gueldres (Dutch: Gelre, German: Geldern) is a historical county, later duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, located in the Low Countries.

Duchy of Guelders
Hertogdom Gelre (nl)
Herzogtum Geldern (de)
Ducatus Geldriae  (Latin)
1096–1795
Coat of arms
Duchy of Guelders and the County of Zutphen, about 1350
StatusDuchy
CapitalGeldern
GovernmentFeudal monarchy
Historical eraMiddle Ages, Renaissance
 Gerard I first
   Count of Guelders
1096
 Raised to duchy
1339
 Held by Jülich
1393–1423
 Acquired by Burgundy
1473
 Lower Quarters to
   Dutch Republic
1581
 Annexed by France
1795
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Lower Lorraine
Burgundian Netherlands
History of the Low Countries
Frisii Belgae
Cana-
nefates
Chamavi,
Tubantes

Gallia Belgica (55 BC – 5th c. AD)
Germania Inferior (83 – 5th c.)
Salian Franks Batavi
unpopulated
(4th–5th c.)
Saxons Salian Franks
(4th–5th c.)
Frisian Kingdom
(6th c.–734)
Frankish Kingdom (481–843)Carolingian Empire (800–843)
Austrasia (511–687)
Middle Francia (843–855) West
Francia

(843–)
Kingdom of Lotharingia (855– 959)
Duchy of Lower Lorraine (959–)
Frisia


Frisian
Freedom

(11–16th
century)

County of
Holland

(880–1432)

Bishopric of
Utrecht

(695–1456)

Duchy of
Brabant

(1183–1430)

Duchy of
Guelders

(1046–1543)

County of
Flanders

(862–1384)

County of
Hainaut

(1071–1432)

County of
Namur

(981–1421)

P.-Bish.
of Liège


(980–1794)

Duchy of
Luxem-
bourg

(1059–1443)
 
Burgundian Netherlands (1384–1482)

Habsburg Netherlands (1482–1795)
(Seventeen Provinces after 1543)
 

Dutch Republic
(1581–1795)

Spanish Netherlands
(1556–1714)
 
 
Austrian Netherlands
(1714–1795)
 
United States of Belgium
(1790)

R. Liège
(1789–'91)
     

Batavian Republic (1795–1806)
Kingdom of Holland (1806–1810)

associated with French First Republic (1795–1804)
part of First French Empire (1804–1815)
   

Princip. of the Netherlands (1813–1815)
 
United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815–1830)
Gr D. L.
(1815–)


Kingdom of the Netherlands (1839–)

Kingdom of Belgium (1830–)
Gr D. of
Luxem-
bourg

(1890–)