Hades

Hades (/ˈhdz/; Greek: ᾍδης, translit. Háidēs; Ἅιδης, Háidēs), in the ancient Greek religion and myth, is the god of the dead and the king of the underworld, with which his name became synonymous.[1] Hades was the eldest son of Cronus and Rhea, although the last son was regurgitated by his father.[2] He and his brothers, Zeus and Poseidon, defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans, and claimed rulership over the cosmos. Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea, with the solid earth, long the province of Gaia, available to all three concurrently. In artistic depictions, Hades is typically portrayed holding a bident and wearing his helm with Cerberus, the three-headed guard dog of the underworld, standing to his side.

Hades
King of the Underworld
God of the dead and riches
Hades/Serapis with Cerberus
AbodeGreek underworld
SymbolCornucopia, Cypress, Narcissus, keys, serpent, mint plant, white poplar, dog, pomegranate, sheep, cattle, screech owl, horse, chariot
Personal information
ParentsCronus and Rhea
SiblingsPoseidon, Demeter, Hestia, Hera, Zeus, Chiron
ConsortPersephone
ChildrenMacaria, and in some cases Melinoë, Plutus, Zagreus and the Erinyes
Roman equivalentDis Pater, Orcus, Pluto

The Etruscan god Aita and the Roman gods Dis Pater and Orcus were eventually taken as equivalent to Hades and merged into Pluto, a Latinization of Plouton (Greek: Πλούτων, translit. Ploútōn),[3] itself a euphemistic title often given to Hades.