Hanafi

The Hanafi school (Arabic: حَنَفِي, romanized: Ḥanafī) is one of the four traditional major Sunni schools (madhabs) of Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh).[1] Its eponym is the 8th-century Kufan scholar, Abū Ḥanīfa an-Nu‘man ibn Thābit, a tabi‘i of Persian origin whose legal views were preserved primarily by his two most important disciples, Abu Yusuf and Muhammad al-Shaybani.[2][3]

Under the patronage of the Abbasids, the Hanafi school flourished in Iraq and spread eastwards, firmly establishing itself in Khorasan and Transoxiana by the 9th-century, where it enjoyed the support of the local Samanid rulers.[4] Turkic expansion introduced the school to the Indian subcontinent and Anatolia, and it was adopted as the chief legal school of the Ottoman Empire.[5]

The Hanafi school is the maddhab with the largest number of adherents, followed by approximately one third of Muslims worldwide.[6][7] It is prevalent in Turkey, Pakistan, the Balkans, the Levant, Central Asia, India, Bangladesh, Egypt and Afghanistan, in addition to parts of Russia, China and Iran.[8][9] The other primary Sunni legal schools are the Maliki, Shafi`i and Hanbali schools.[10][11]