Hera

Hera (/ˈhɛrə, ˈhɪərə/; Greek: Ἥρα, translit. Hḗrā; Ἥρη, Hḗrē in Ionic and Homeric Greek) is the goddess of women, marriage, family and childbirth in ancient Greek religion and mythology, one of the twelve Olympians and the sister and wife of Zeus. She is the daughter of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. Hera rules over Mount Olympus as queen of the gods. A matronly figure, Hera served as both the patroness and protectress of married women, presiding over weddings and blessing marital unions. One of Hera's defining characteristics is her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' numerous lovers and illegitimate offspring, as well as the mortals who cross her.

Hera on an antique fresco from Pompeii

Hera
Queen of the Gods
Goddess of marriage, women, childbirth, and family
Member of the Twelve Olympians
The Campana Hera, a Roman copy of a Hellenistic original, from the Louvre
AbodeMount Olympus
SymbolPomegranate, peacock feather, diadem, cow, lily, lotus, cuckoo, panther, scepter, throne, lion
MountChariot drawn by peacocks
Personal information
ParentsCronus and Rhea
SiblingsPoseidon, Hades, Demeter, Hestia, Zeus, Chiron
ConsortZeus
ChildrenAngelos, Ares, Eileithyia, Enyo, Eris, Hebe, Hephaestus
Roman equivalentJuno
Etruscan equivalentUni

Hera is commonly seen with the animals she considers sacred, including the cow, lion and the peacock. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the polos (a high cylindrical crown worn by several of the Great Goddesses), Hera may hold a pomegranate in her hand, emblem of fertile blood and death and a substitute for the narcotic capsule of the opium poppy.[1]

Her Roman counterpart is Juno.[2]