Historia Philippicae et Totius Mundi Origines et Terrae Situs

The Historia Philippicae et Totius Mundi Origines et Terrae Situs, or Philippic History and Origins of the Entire World and All of its Lands, by the second-century Roman writer Justin is an epitome of the Augustan historian Pompeius Trogus' earlier expansive work the Historiæ Phillippicæ, and the only surviving link, although much of the content has been altered.[1]

Historia Philippicae et Totius Mundi Origines et Terrae Situs
Title page of a 1688 edition
DateLate 2nd or early 3rd Century AD, probably prior to 226 (disputed)[1]
Place of originRome[1]
Language(s)Latin, Late Latin[1]
Author(s)Justin
Format44 brief books and a preface
ContentsEpitome of the Historia Philippicae

The principal work was intended to cover the history of the world from the beginning until the time of the Caesars, focused on Greece and her rulers, nations and peoples, and it was from this base that Justin created his Epitome, slimming it down by focusing on "whatever [parts] was most worthy of being known" and removing parts which "were neither attractive for the pleasure of reading, nor necessary by way of example",[2] resulting in a work approximately one-sixth the length of the original[3] and described as a "capricious anthology" rather than a regular epitome.[4]

Despite its altered nature, the work stands as an important piece of history, both as a connection to the sole pre-Christian work of world history written in Latin and as one of the few written sources into several notable Hellenistic figures.