House of Valois-Burgundy

The House of Valois-Burgundy (French: Maison de Valois-Bourgogne, Dutch: Huis van Valois-Bourgondië), or the Younger House of Burgundy, was a noble French family deriving from the royal House of Valois. It is distinct from the Capetian House of Burgundy, descendants of King Robert II of France, though both houses stem from the Capetian dynasty. They ruled the Duchy of Burgundy from 1363 to 1482 and later came to rule vast lands including Artois, Flanders, Luxembourg, Hainault, the county palatine of Burgundy (Franche-Comté), and other lands through marriage, forming what is now known as the Burgundian State.

House of Valois-Burgundy
Parent houseHouse of Valois
Country France
 Burgundy
Founded6 September 1363 (1363-09-06)
FounderPhilip the Bold
Final rulerMary of Burgundy
Titles
Estate(s)Palace of the Dukes
Dissolution27 March 1482 (1482-03-27)

The term "Valois Dukes of Burgundy" is employed to refer to the dynasty which began after King John II of France granted the French Duchy of Burgundy to his youngest son, Philip the Bold in 1363.

During the Hundred Years' War, the dukes rivalled with their royal cousins uniting a great number of French and Imperial fiefs under their rule. However, their plans to establish an autonomous kingdom ultimately failed when the last duke, Charles the Bold, sparked the Burgundian Wars and was killed in the Battle of Nancy in 1477. The final ruler of the dynasty was his daughter, Mary. Her lands outside of France passed to her eldest son, Philip the Handsome, to become the Habsburg Netherlands, while the Duchy of Burgundy itself returned to the kingdom of France. Mary died in 1482, thus ending the House of Valois-Burgundy.


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