Huddersfield (UK Parliament constituency)


Huddersfield is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1983 by Barry Sheerman of Labour Co-op.[n 2]

Huddersfield
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Boundary of Huddersfield in West Yorkshire
Location of West Yorkshire within England
CountyWest Yorkshire
Electorate65,917 (December 2019)[1]
Current constituency
Created1983
Member of ParliamentBarry Sheerman (Labour Co-op)
Number of membersOne
Created fromHuddersfield East
Huddersfield West
18321950
Number of membersOne
Type of constituencyBorough constituency
Replaced byHuddersfield East
Huddersfield West
Created fromYorkshire

Boundaries


Map of present boundaries

1983–2010: The Borough of Kirklees wards of Almondbury, Birkby, Dalton, Deighton, Newsome, and Paddock.

2010–present: The Borough of Kirklees wards of Almondbury, Ashbrow, Dalton, Greenhead, and Newsome.

Constituency profile


Apart from four years tenure as MP by Geoffrey Dickens for Huddersfield West (1979-1983), the area (including its divided halves for the 33 years to 1983) has returned a Labour Party MP since 1945.

The constituency is currently held by the Labour Party, although the Liberal Democrats made inroads by coming second in the 2005 general election, and in the 2010 general election Karen Tween of the Conservative Party narrowed the incumbent's lead to a relatively average 4,472 votes and the new Liberal Democrat candidate slipped into third place. There are currently Green Party councillors in Newsome, and some Tory and Liberal Democrat councillors in Almondbury, but the remaining wards are safely Labour.

Members of Parliament


ElectionMember[2] Party
1832Lewis FentonWhig[3]
1834 by-electionJohn BlackburneWhig[3]
1837 by-electionEdward ElliceWhig[3][4][5][6][7]
1837William Crompton-StansfieldWhig[8][7][9][5][10][11][3]
1853 by-electionViscount GoderichWhig[12][13][14]
1857Edward AkroydWhig[9][15][16]
1859Edward LeathamLiberal
1865Thomas CroslandLiberal
1868Edward LeathamLiberal
1886William SummersLiberal
1893 by-electionSir Joseph CroslandConservative
1895Sir James WoodhouseLiberal
1906 by-electionArthur SherwellLiberal
1918Sir Charles SykesCoalition Liberal
1922Sir Arthur MarshallLiberal
1923James HudsonLabour
1931William MabaneNational Liberal[n 3]
1945Joseph MallalieuLabour
1950 constituency abolished: see Huddersfield East and Huddersfield West
1983 constituency reconstituted
1983Barry SheermanLabour Co-operative

Elections


Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Huddersfield [17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 20,509 49.0 11.4
Conservative Ken Davy 15,572 37.2 4.2
Liberal Democrats James Wilkinson 2,367 5.7 3.1
Green Andrew Cooper 1,768 4.2 1.0
Brexit Party Stuart Hale 1,666 4.0 New
Majority 4,937 11.8 15.6
Turnout 41,882 63.9 1.6
Labour Co-op hold Swing 7.8
General election 2017: Huddersfield[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 26,470 60.4 +15.5
Conservative Scott Benton 14,465 33.0 +6.2
Green Andrew Cooper 1,395 3.2 -3.7
Liberal Democrats Zulfiqar Ali 1,155 2.6 -3.2
Yorkshire Bikatshi Katenga 274 0.6 New
Independent Marteen Thokkudubiyyapu 75 0.2 New
Majority 12,005 27.4 +9.3
Turnout 43,834 65.5 +3.5
Labour Co-op hold Swing +4.7
General election 2015: Huddersfield[19][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 18,186 44.9 +6.1
Conservative Itrat Ali 10,841 26.8 -1.0
UKIP Rob Butler 5,948 14.7 New
Green Andrew Cooper 2,798 6.9 +2.9
Liberal Democrats Zulfiqar Ali 2,365 5.8 -18.9
TUSC Mike Forster 340 0.8 0.0
Majority 7,345 18.1 +7.1
Turnout 40,478 62.0 +0.9
Labour Co-op hold Swing
General election 2010: Huddersfield[21][22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 15,725 38.8 -7.6
Conservative Karen Tweed 11,253 27.8 +6.7
Liberal Democrats James Blanchard 10,023 24.7 +0.6
Green Andrew Cooper 1,641 4.0 -0.6
BNP Rachel Firth 1,563 3.9 +0.9
TUSC Paul Cooney[23] 319 0.8 New
Majority 4,472 11.0
Turnout 40,524 61.1 +4.5
Labour Co-op hold Swing 7.1

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Huddersfield[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 16,341 46.8 6.4
Liberal Democrats Emma Bone 7,990 22.9 +7.9
Conservative David Meacock 7,597 21.7 3.2
Green Julie Stewart-Turner 1,651 4.7 +1.2
BNP Karl Hanson 1,036 3.0 New
Independent Theresa Quarmby 325 0.9 New
Majority 8,351 23.9 -4.4
Turnout 34,940 56.6 +1.6
Labour Co-op hold Swing 7.1
General election 2001: Huddersfield[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 18,840 53.2 3.3
Conservative Paul Baverstock 8,794 24.9 +4.0
Liberal Democrats Neil Bentley 5,300 15.0 2.2
Green John Phillips 1,254 3.5 +1.4
UKIP Judith Longman 613 1.7 New
Socialist Alliance Graham Hellawell 374 1.1 New
Socialist Labour George Randall 208 0.6 New
Majority 10,046 28.3 -7.3
Turnout 35,383 55.0 12.0
Labour Co-op hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Huddersfield[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 25,171 56.5
Conservative Bill Forrow 9,323 20.9
Liberal Democrats Gordon Beever 7,642 17.2
Referendum Paul McNulty 1,480 3.3 New
Green John Phillips 938 2.1 N/A
Majority 15,848 35.6
Turnout 44,554 67.0
Labour Co-op hold Swing
General election 1992: Huddersfield[27][28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 23,832 48.7 +2.8
Conservative JM Kenyon 16,574 33.9 +2.5
Liberal Democrats AE Denham 7,777 15.9 −5.6
Green Nicholas Harvey 576 1.2 −0.1
Natural Law M Cran 135 0.3 New
Majority 7,258 14.8 +0.3
Turnout 48,894 72.4 −3.1
Labour Co-op hold Swing +0.2

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Huddersfield[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 23,019 45.88
Conservative Nick Hawkins 15,741 31.37
Liberal John Smithson 10,773 21.47
Green Nicholas Harvey 638 1.27 New
Majority 7,278 14.51
Turnout 50,171 75.54
Labour Co-op hold Swing
General election 1983: Huddersfield[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Co-op Barry Sheerman 20,051 41.39
Conservative J Tweddle 16,096 33.23
Liberal KJL Hasler 12,027 24.83
Independent H Hirst 271 0.56
Majority 3,955 8.16
Turnout 48,445 71.06
Labour Co-op win (new seat)

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Joseph Mallalieu 33,362 48.3 +9.1
Liberal National William Mabane 24,496 35.5 -25.3
Liberal Roy Harrod 11,119 16.2 New
Majority 8,866 12.8 N/A
Turnout 68,977 78.4 +5.2
Labour gain from Liberal National Swing +17.2

General Election 1939/40:

Another general election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1935: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal National William Mabane 37,009 60.8 -9.3
Labour William Pickles 23,844 39.2 +9.3
Majority 60,853 21.6 -18.6
Turnout 60,853 73.2 -10.1
Liberal National hold Swing -9.3
General election 1931: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal National William Mabane 47,056 70.1 +38.5
Labour James Hudson 20,034 29.9 -8.4
Majority 27,022 40.2 N/A
Turnout 67,090 83.3 -2.8
Liberal National gain from Labour Swing +23.5

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour James Hudson 25,966 38.3 +2.0
Liberal William Mabane 21,398 31.6 0.1
Unionist Enoch Hill 20,361 30.1 1.9
Majority 4,568 6.7 +2.4
Turnout 67,725 86.1 2.4
Registered electors 78,635
Labour hold Swing +1.0
General election 1924: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour James Hudson 19,010 36.3 0.4
Unionist Enoch Hill 16,745 32.0 +5.3
Liberal Arthur Marshall 16,626 31.7 4.9
Majority 2,265 4.3 +4.2
Turnout 52,381 88.5 +6.6
Registered electors 59,176
Labour hold Swing 2.8
General election 1923: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour James Hudson 17,430 36.7 +3.2
Liberal Arthur Marshall 17,404 36.6 +2.6
Unionist Charles Tinker 12,694 26.7 New
Majority 26 0.1 N/A
Turnout 47,528 81.9 1.2
Registered electors 58,029
Labour gain from Liberal Swing +0.3
Arthur Marshall
General election 1922: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Arthur Marshall 15,879 34.0 +5.3
Labour James Hudson 15,673 33.5 +1.0
National Liberal Charles Sykes 15,212 32.5 6.3
Majority 206 0.5 N/A
Turnout 46,764 83.1 +13.3
Registered electors 56,243
Liberal gain from National Liberal Swing +5.8

Elections in the 1910s

Sykes
General election 1918: Huddersfield
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
C Coalition Liberal Charles Sykes 15,234 38.8 N/A
Labour Harry Snell 12,737 32.5 +3.5
Liberal Ernest Woodhead 11,256 28.7 8.8
Majority 2,497 6.3 N/A
Turnout 39,227 69.8 20.7
Registered electors 56,200
Coalition Liberal gain from Liberal Swing N/A
C indicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election December 1910 Huddersfield[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Arthur Sherwell 6,458 37.5 2.3
Conservative Joseph Henry Kaye 5,777 33.5 +4.9
Labour Harry Snell 4,988 29.0 2.6
Majority 681 4.0 4.2
Turnout 17,223 90.5 4.1
Registered electors 19,021
Liberal hold Swing 3.6
Harry Snell
General election January 1910 Huddersfield[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Arthur Sherwell 7,158 39.8 +1.6
Labour Harry Snell 5,686 31.6 3.6
Conservative Harold Smith 5,153 28.6 +2.0
Majority 1,472 8.2 +5.2
Turnout 17,997 94.6 +0.6
Registered electors 19,021
Liberal hold Swing +2.6

Elections in the 1900s

1906 Huddersfield by-election[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Arthur Sherwell 5,762 36.0 2.2
Labour T. Russell Williams 5,422 33.8 1.4
Conservative John Foster Fraser 4,844 30.2 +3.6
Majority 340 2.2 0.8
Turnout 16,028 91.2 2.8
Registered electors 17,568
Liberal hold Swing +0.4
General election 1906 Huddersfield[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal James Woodhouse 6,302 38.2 15.4
Labour Repr. Cmte. T. Russell Williams 5,813 35.2 New
Conservative John Foster Fraser 4,391 26.6 19.8
Majority 489 3.0 4.2
Turnout 16,506 94.0 +6.2
Registered electors 17,568
Liberal hold Swing +2.2
General election 1900 Huddersfield[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal James Woodhouse 7,896 53.6 +6.1
Conservative Hildred Carlile 6,831 46.4 +5.1
Majority 1,065 7.2 +1.0
Turnout 14,727 87.8 2.0
Registered electors 16,770
Liberal hold Swing +0.5

Elections in the 1890s

Woodhouse
General election 1895: Huddersfield [31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal James Woodhouse 6,755 47.5 3.4
Conservative Joseph Crosland 5,868 41.3 7.8
Ind. Labour Party Russell Smart 1,594 11.2 New
Majority 887 6.2 +4.4
Turnout 14,217 89.8 0.3
Registered electors 15,832
Liberal hold Swing +2.2
1893 Huddersfield by-election[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Joseph Crosland 7,068 50.1 +1.0
Liberal Joseph Woodhead 7,033 49.9 1.0
Majority 35 0.2 N/A
Turnout 14,101 90.7 +0.6
Registered electors 15,550
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +1.0
  • Caused by Summers' death.
General election 1892: Huddersfield [31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal William Summers 7,098 50.9 +0.1
Conservative Joseph Crosland 6,837 49.1 0.1
Majority 261 1.8 +0.2
Turnout 13,935 90.1 +8.5
Registered electors 15,466
Liberal hold Swing +0.1

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Huddersfield [31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal William Summers 6,210 50.8 -2.1
Conservative Joseph Crosland 6,026 49.2 +2.1
Majority 184 1.6 -4.2
Turnout 12,236 81.6 6.1
Registered electors 14,991
Liberal hold Swing -2.1
General election 1885: Huddersfield [31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham 6,960 52.9 8.1
Conservative Joseph Crosland 6,194 47.1 +8.1
Majority 766 5.8 16.2
Turnout 13,154 87.7 +1.8
Registered electors 14,991
Liberal hold Swing 8.1
General election 1880: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham 7,008 61.0 +7.8
Conservative William Alexander Lindsay[33] 4,486 39.0 7.8
Majority 2,522 22.0 +15.6
Turnout 11,494 85.9 3.5
Registered electors 13,386
Liberal hold Swing +7.8

Elections in the 1870s

General election 1874: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham 5,668 53.2 N/A
Conservative Thomas Brooke[34] 4,985 46.8 New
Majority 683 6.4 N/A
Turnout 10,653 89.4 N/A
Registered electors 11,917
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham Unopposed
Registered electors 11,242
Liberal hold
By-election, 20 March 1868: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham 1,111 58.5 +14.9
Conservative William Campbell Sleigh 789 41.5 New
Majority 322 17.0 +4.2
Turnout 1,900 88.9 -4.4
Registered electors 2,138
Liberal hold Swing N/A
  • Caused by Crosland's death.
General election 1865: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Thomas Crosland 1,019 56.4 +7.0
Liberal Edward Leatham 787 43.6 7.0
Majority 232 12.8 +11.6
Turnout 1,806 84.5 8.2
Registered electors 2,138
Liberal hold Swing +7.0

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1859: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edward Leatham 779 50.6 +8.8
Liberal Edward Akroyd 760 49.4 8.8
Majority 19 1.2 14.2
Turnout 1,539 92.7 +1.7
Registered electors 1,660
Liberal hold Swing +8.8
General election 1857: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Edward Akroyd 823 58.2 +6.8
Radical Richard Cobden 590 41.8 6.8
Majority 233 16.4 +13.6
Turnout 1,413 91.0 +1.9
Registered electors 1,552
Whig hold Swing +6.8
By-election, 22 April 1853: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig George Robinson 675 53.2 +1.8
Radical Joseph Starkey[14][35] 593 46.8 1.8
Majority 82 6.4 +3.6
Turnout 1,268 89.6 +0.5
Registered electors 1,415
Whig hold Swing +1.8
  • Caused by Stansfield's election being declared void on petition due to bribery and treating which "prevailed to a great extent".[36]
General election 1852: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Crompton-Stansfield 625 51.4 0.4
Radical William Willans[37][38] 590 48.6 +0.4
Majority 35 2.8 0.8
Turnout 1,215 89.1 +0.4
Registered electors 1,364
Whig hold Swing 0.4

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1847: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Crompton-Stansfield 525 51.8 N/A
Radical John Cheetham 488 48.2 N/A
Majority 37 3.6 N/A
Turnout 1,013 88.7 N/A
Registered electors 1,142
Whig hold Swing N/A
General election 1841: Huddersfield [32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Crompton-Stansfield Unopposed
Registered electors 1,003
Whig hold

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1837: Huddersfield [32][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Crompton-Stansfield 323 51.8 17.1
Conservative Richard Oastler 301 48.2 N/A
Majority 22 3.6 34.1
Turnout 624 78.0 +25.8
Registered electors 800
Whig hold Swing N/A
By-election, 8 May 1837: Huddersfield [32][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Edward Ellice 340 54.0 14.9
Conservative Richard Oastler 290 46.0 New
Majority 50 8.0 29.7
Turnout 630 78.8 +26.6
Registered electors 800
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • Caused by Blackburne's death
General election 1835: Huddersfield [32][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig John Blackburne (Huddersfield MP) 241 68.9 +5.5
Radical William Augustus Johnson[39] 109 31.1 5.5
Majority 132 37.8 +11.0
Turnout 350 52.2 16.1
Registered electors 671
Whig hold Swing +5.5
By-election, 9 January 1834: Huddersfield [32][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig John Blackburne (Huddersfield MP) 234 47.8 15.6
Tory Michael Thomas Sadler 147 30.0 New
Radical Joseph Wood 108 22.0 14.6
Whig John Charles Ramsden 1 0.2 New
Majority 87 17.8 9.0
Turnout 490 81.1 +12.8
Registered electors 640
Whig hold Swing 0.5
  • Caused by Fenton's death. While Ramsden was not a candidate, a local spirit merchant, Paul Hirst, voted for him.
General election 1832: Huddersfield [32][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Whig Lewis Fenton 263 63.4
Radical Joseph Wood 152 36.6
Majority 111 26.8
Turnout 415 68.3
Registered electors 608
Whig win (new seat)

See also


Notes and references


Notes
  1. A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. Mabane's exact party label was confused for much of his time in the Commons before becoming Lord Mabane (first Baron). His local Liberal association was affiliated to the official Liberals until 1939, but Mabane was frequently listed as being a National Liberal, which he repeatedly sought to deny, despite supporting the National Government when the official Liberals ceased to. However the authoritative F.W.S. Craig volume and the contemporary Times Guide to the House of Commons have him as a National Liberal
References
  1. "Constituency data: electorates – House of Commons Library". Parliament UK. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  2. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "H" (part 4)
  3. Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. pp. 146–147. Retrieved 10 November 2018 via Google Books.
  4. Smith, Henry Stooks (1842). The Register of Parliamentary Contested Elections (Second ed.). Simpkin, Marshall & Company. p. 211. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  5. Churton, Edward (1838). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer: 1838. Scott, Webster and Geary. pp. 82, 214.
  6. "Rt. Hon. Edward Ellice". Legacies of British Slave-ownership. University College London. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  7. Mosse, Richard Bartholomew (1838). The Parliamentary Guide: a concise history of the Members of both Houses, etc. pp. 167, 227. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  8. Driver, Felix (1993). "The politics of territory: the anti-Poor Law movement". Power and pauperism: The workhouse system 1834–1884. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 129. ISBN 0-521-38151-7. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  9. Marland, Hilary (1987). Medicine and society in Wakefield and Huddersfield 1780–1870. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 33. ISBN 0521-32575-7. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  10. "State of Polls and Names of Members". London Evening Standard. 29 July 1837. p. 3. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. "Huddersfield Election". Leeds Times. 29 July 1837. p. 5. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  12. "The Late Lord Ripon". The Spectator. 3 December 1921. p. 18. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  13. "Huddersfield Election". Dublin Evening Post. 23 April 1853. p. 3. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  14. "Local & General Intelligence". Newcastle Journal. 23 April 1853. p. 5. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  15. "Colonel Edward Akroyd". From Weaver to Web: Online Visual Archive of Calderdale History. Calderdale Council. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  16. Dennis, Richard (2014). "Class, behaviour and residence in nineteenth-century society: the lower middle class in Huddersfield in 1871". In Thrift, Nigel; Williams, Peter (eds.). Class and Space: The making of urban society. Routledge. p. 90. ISBN 9781317652076. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  17. https://www.kirklees.gov.uk/beta/voting-and-elections/pdf/statement-of-persons-nominated-parliamentary-huddersfield.pdf
  18. "Huddersfield parliamentary constituency". BBC News.
  19. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  20. "Huddersfield". BBC News. Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  21. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  22. "UK > England > Yorkshire & the Humber > Huddersfield". Election 2010. BBC. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 12 May 2010.
  23. "Candidates for TUSC". www.tusc.org.uk.
  24. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  25. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  26. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  27. "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  28. "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  29. "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  30. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  31. British parliamentary election results, 1885-1918 (Craig)
  32. Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  33. "The General Election". Manchester Times. 10 April 1880. p. 6. Retrieved 29 November 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  34. "A Brook to the Rescue". Huddersfield Chronicle. 31 January 1874. p. 5. Retrieved 1 January 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  35. "Meeting of Mr. Starkey's Supporters". Huddersfield Chronicle. 9 April 1853. p. 5. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  36. "House of Commons". The Scotsman. 16 March 1853. p. 2. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  37. "Address". Huddersfield and Holmfirth Examiner. 3 July 1852. p. 6. Retrieved 14 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  38. Binfield, Clyde (April 1981). Buick Knox, R.; Binfield, Clyde (eds.). "Asquith: The Formation of a Prime Minister" (PDF). The Journal of the United Reformed Church Historical Society. 2 (7): 223. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  39. "10 January 1835". Sun. p. 2. Retrieved 15 April 2020.