Hundred Days Offensive

The Hundred Days Offensive (8 August to 11 November 1918) was a series of massive Allied offensives which ended the First World War. Beginning with the Battle of Amiens (8–12 August) on the Western Front, the Allies pushed the Central Powers back, undoing their gains from the German spring offensive. The Germans retreated to the Hindenburg Line, but the Allies broke through the line with a series of victories, starting with the Battle of St Quentin Canal on 29 September. The offensive, together with a revolution breaking out in Germany, led to the Armistice of 11 November 1918 which ended the war with an Allied victory. The term "Hundred Days Offensive" does not refer to a battle or strategy, but rather the rapid series of Allied victories against which the German Army had no reply.

Hundred Days Offensive
Part of the Western Front of World War I

Allied gains in late 1918
Date8 August – 11 November 1918
Location
Amiens, France to Mons, Belgium
Result

Allied victory

Belligerents
 France
 British Empire
 United States
 Belgium
 Italy[1][2]
 Portugal
Siam
 German Empire
 Austria-Hungary
Commanders and leaders
Ferdinand Foch
Philippe Pétain
Douglas Haig
John J. Pershing
King Albert I
Paul von Hindenburg
Erich Ludendorff
Wilhelm Groener
Strength
Strength on 11 November 1918:[3]
c.2,559,000
c.1,900,000
c.1,900,000[4]
c.190,000
Strength on 11 November 1918:[3]
c.3,562,000
Casualties and losses
18 July – 11 November:
1,070,000[5]
531,000
412,000
127,000
18 July – 11 November:
1,172,075[5]
~100,000+ killed
685,733 wounded
386,342 captured
6,700 artillery pieces
Breakdown
  • Men and materiel captured, by country
    • BEF: 188,700 prisoners, 2,840 guns[6]
    • French: 139,000 prisoners, 1,880 guns[7]
    • US: 44,142 prisoners, 1,481 guns[7]
    • Belgian: 14,500 prisoners, 414 guns[7]
17,500[8]
2,500 killed
5,000 captured
10,000 wounded