Huntingdon (UK Parliament constituency)


Huntingdon is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Jonathan Djanogly, a Conservative.[n 2]

Huntingdon
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Boundary of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire
Location of Cambridgeshire within England
CountyCambridgeshire
Electorate83,371 (2018)[1]
Major settlementsSt Neots, Huntingdon, St Ives, Godmanchester
Current constituency
Created1983
Member of ParliamentJonathan Djanogly (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created fromHuntingdonshire and Peterborough[2]
18851918
Number of membersOne
Type of constituencyCounty constituency
Replaced byHuntingdonshire
Created fromHuntingdonshire
c1290–1885
Number of membersc1290–1868: Two
1868–1885: One
Type of constituencyBorough constituency

It is a safe Conservative Party seat and was the seat of former Conservative Prime Minister, John Major.

History


The constituency of Huntingdon has existed in three separate forms: as a Parliamentary Borough from 1295 to 1885; as a Division of a Parliamentary County from 1885 to 1918; and as a County Constituency from 1983 until the present day.

Representatives for the seat, the standard two burgesses per parliamentary borough, were summoned to form the first fully assembled parliament, the Model Parliament in 1295 and at all parliaments assembled from then until 1868, in which year the constituency was reduced to a single-member Borough in accordance with the Reform Act 1867. In the mid-17th century, this was Oliver Cromwell's constituency.

Under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, the Parliamentary Borough was abolished altogether and the two-member Parliamentary County of Huntingdonshire was replaced by the two-single member seats formally known as the Northern or Ramsey Division and the Southern or Huntingdon Division. It was abolished under the Representation of the People Act 1918 when it was re-combined with Ramsey and Huntingdonshire was re-established as a single member constituency.

As a result of the Local Government Act 1972, the two counties of Cambridgeshire and Isle of Ely, and Huntingdon and Peterborough were merged to form the non-metropolitan county of Cambridgeshire, with effect from 1 April 1974. However, the next redistribution did not come into effect until the 1983 general election, when the majority of the Huntingdonshire constituency, including Huntingdon, Godmanchester, Ramsey and St Ives, was formed into the new County Constituency of Huntingdon. Areas to the south of Peterborough, which were now part of the expanded City of Peterborough, were included the Borough Constituency of Peterborough and southernmost areas, including St Neots, were included in the new County Constituency of South West Cambridgeshire. The re-established constituency also included rural areas to the west of Peterborough, including Barnack and Werrington.

There were significant boundary changes at the 1997 general election, when the neighbouring seat of North West Cambridgeshire was created from areas previously in the seats of Huntingdon and Peterborough.

The former Conservative Prime Minister (1990–1997) John Major represented the seat from its re-creation in 1983 until his retirement in 2001. His majority in 1992 (36,230) was the largest majority for any member of parliament post-1832 until 2017, in which George Howarth won a 42,214 vote majority in Knowsley.

Boundaries and boundary changes


1832–1885: The townships of Huntingdon and Godmanchester.[3]

1885–1918: The Sessional Divisions of Leightonstone and Toseland, incorporating the towns of Huntingdon, Godmanchester, and St Neots.[4]

1983–1997: The District of Huntingdon wards of Brampton, Bury, Earith, Ellington, Elton, Farcet, Fenstanton, Godmanchester, Hemingford Abbots and Hilton, Hemingford Grey, Houghton and Wyton, Huntingdon North, Huntingdon West, Kimbolton, Needingworth, Ramsey, Sawtry, Somersham, Stilton, St Ives North, St Ives South, The Stukeleys, Upwood and The Raveleys, Warboys, and Yaxley, and the City of Peterborough wards of Barnack, Glinton, Northborough, Werrington, and Wittering.[5]

1997–2010: The District of Huntingdonshire wards of Brampton, Buckden, Eaton Ford, Eaton Socon, Ellington, Eynesbury, Fenstanton, Godmanchester, Gransden, Hemingford Abbots and Hilton, Hemingford Grey, Houghton and Wyton, Huntingdon North, Huntingdon West, Kimbolton, Needingworth, Paxton, Priory Park, St Ives North, St Ives South, Staughton, The Offords, and The Stukeleys.[6]

Gained the parts of the District of Huntingdon, including St Neots, which had previously been part of the abolished South West Cambridgeshire constituency. The City of Peterborough ward of Werrington was transferred to the Peterborough constituency. Remaining Peterborough wards and northern parts of the District of Huntingdon, including Ramsey, were included in the new County Constituency of North West Cambridgeshire.

2010–present: The District of Huntingdonshire wards of Alconbury and The Stukeleys, Brampton, Buckden, Fenstanton, Godmanchester, Gransden and The Offords, Huntingdon East, Huntingdon North, Huntingdon West, Kimbolton and Staughton, Little Paxton, St Ives East, St Ives South, St Ives West, St Neots Eaton Ford, St Neots Eaton Socon, St Neots Eynesbury, St Neots Priory Park, and The Hemingfords.[7]

Local authority wards revised. Further minor loss to North West Cambridgeshire.

The constituency consists of the towns of St Neots, Huntingdon, St Ives, Godmanchester and a number of smaller settlements in Western Cambridgeshire.

Members of Parliament


MPs c1290–1660

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1361William Wightman[8]
1365William Wightman[8]
1366William Wightman[8]
1369William Wightman[8]
1371William Wightman[8]
1372William Wightman[8]
1373William Wightman[8]
1376William Wightman[8]
1377 (Jan)William Wightman[8]
1377 (Oct)William Wightman[8]
1378William Wightman[8]
1380 (Jan)William Wightman[8]
1381William Wightman[8]
1382 (May)William Wightman[8]
1382 (Oct)William Wightman[8]
1383 (Oct)William Wightman[8]
1384 (Apr)William Wightman[8]
1384 (Nov)William Wightman[8]
1386William LutonThomas Daniel[9]
1388 (Feb)William WightmanThomas Daniel[9]
1388 (Sep)William WightmanThomas Daniel[9]
1390 (Jan)William WightmanThomas Daniel[9]
1390 (Nov)
1391William WightmanWilliam Luton[9]
1393William AlbonJohn Pabenham[9]
1394Henry ProudeJohn Dunhead I[9]
1395John CutlerJohn Dunhead II[9]
1397 (Jan)Walter WillardbyJohn Dunhead I[9]
1397 (Sep)John HawkinJohn Dunhead II[9]
1399John HawkinRichard Prentice[9]
1401John SabrisforthJohn Rous[9]
1402Walter DevenhamAmbrose Newton[9]
1404 (Jan)
1404 (Oct)
1406John HawkinRichard Prentice[9]
1407Richard PrenticeJohn Navet[9]
1410
1411Robert PeckThomas Freeman[9]
1413 (Feb)
1413 (May)Robert PeckJohn Denton[9]
1414 (Apr)Robert PeckJohn Denton[9]
1414 (Nov)Roger ChamberlainJohn Foxton[9]
1415Robert PeckJohn Bickley[9]
1416 (Mar)Robert PeckJohn Denton[9]
1416 (Oct)
1417John FetteRichard Freeman[9]
1419Richard SpicerHugh Parson[9]
1420John Abbotsley (MP)John Foxton[9]
1421 (May)Robert Peck IIJohn Colles[9]
1421 (Dec)Robert Peck IIGeorge Gidding[9]
1510–1523No names known[10]
1529Thomas HallWilliam Webbe[10]
1536 ?
1539 ?
1542 ?
1545 ?
1547John ArscottJohn Millicent[10]
1553 (Mar)William TyrwhittThomas Maria Wingfield[10]
1553 (Oct)Thomas Maria WingfieldJohn Purvey[10]
1554 (Apr)Thomas Maria WingfieldSimon Throckmorton[10]
1554 (Nov)Philip ClampeWilliam Horwood[10]
1555Robert BrockbankThomas Worlich[10]
1558Robert BrockbankJohn Brigandine[10]
1559 (Jan)Richard PatrickWilliam Symcots[11]
1562/3Richard Gooderick'George Blyth[11]
1571Tristram TyrwhittRalph Rokeby[11]
1572 (Apr)Thomas SladeJohn Turpin[11]
1584 (Nov)Francis FlowerWilliam Cervington[11]
1586Francis FlowerWilliam Cervington[11]
1588 (Oct)Francis FlowerWilliam Cervington[11]
1593Robert LeeRobert Cromwell[11]
1597 (Oct)Richard CromwellRobert Cooke[11]
1601William BeecherThomas Chichley[11]
1604Henry CromwellThomas Harley
1614Sir Christopher HattonSir Miles Fleetwood
1621–1622Sir Henry St JohnSir Miles Sandys, 1st Baronet
1624Sir Arthur MainwaringSir Henry St John
1625Sir Arthur MainwaringSir Henry St John
1626Sir Arthur MainwaringJohn Goldsborough
1628Oliver CromwellJames Montagu
1629–1640No Parliaments summoned
Apr 1640Robert BernardWilliam Montagu
Nov 1640George MontaguEdward Montagu, ennobled in 1644
and replaced by
Abraham Burrell
1653Not represented in Barebones Parliament
1654John Bernard
1656John Bernard
1659John ThurloeSir John Bernard
1659Abraham Burrell

MPs 1660–1868

YearFirst member[12]First partySecond member[12]Second party
1660 John Bernard Nicholas Pedley
1661 Sir John Cotton, 3rd Bt Lionel Walden
Apr 1679 Hon. Sidney Wortley-Montagu Sir Nicholas Pedley
Aug 1679 Lionel Walden
1685 Hon. Oliver Montagu
1689 John Bigg Hon. Sidney Wortley-Montagu
1690 Hon. Richard Montagu
1695 John Pocklington
1697 Francis Wortley-Montagu
1698 Edward Carteret
1701 The Earl of Orrery
1702 Anthony Hammond
1705 Edward Wortley Montagu Sir John Cotton, 4th Bt
1706 John Pedley
1708 Francis Page
1713 Sidney Wortley-Montagu Viscount Hinchingbrooke
1722 Edward Wortley Montagu Roger Handasyde
1734 Edward Montagu
May 1741 Hon. Wills Hill
Dec 1741 Albert Nesbitt
1747 Kelland Courtenay
1748 John Montagu
1754 Robert Jones
1768 Henry Seymour
Feb 1774 Hon. William Augustus Montagu
Oct 1774 George Wombwell
1776 The Lord MulgraveTory[13]
1780 Hugh PalliserTory[13]
1784 Sir Walter RawlinsonTory[13] Lancelot BrownTory[13]
1787 John Willett PayneTory[13]
Jun 1790 Hon. John George MontaguTory[13]
Dec 1790 Henry SpeedTory[13]
1796 William Henry FellowesTory[13] John CalvertTory[13]
1807 William Meeke FarmerTory[13]
1809 Samuel FarmerTory[13]
1818 William Augustus MontaguTory[13]
1820 Earl of AncramTory[13]
1824 James StuartTory[13]
1831 Jonathan PeelTory[13][14] Sir Frederick PollockTory[13][14]
1834 Conservative[13][14] Conservative[13][14]
1844 Thomas BaringConservative[14]
1868representation reduced to one member

MPs 1868–1918

ElectionMember[12]Party
1868 Thomas BaringConservative
1873 by-election Sir John Burgess KarslakeConservative
1876 by-election Edward MontaguConservative
1884 by-election Sir Robert PeelConservative
1885 Thomas CooteLiberal
1886 Arthur Smith-BarryConservative
1900 George MontaguConservative
1906 Samuel WhitbreadLiberal
1910 (Jan) John CatorConservative
1918 constituency abolished, Huntingdonshire from 1918

MPs since 1983

ElectionMember[12]Party
1983 Rt Hon John MajorConservative
2001 Jonathan DjanoglyConservative

Elections


Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Huntingdon [15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 32,386 54.8 -0.3
Labour Samuel Sweek 13,003 22.0 -8.9
Liberal Democrats Mark Argent 9,432 15.9 +7.4
Green Daniel Laycock 2,233 3.8 +2.0
Independent Paul Bullen 1,789 3.0 New
Independent Tom Varghese 304 0.5 New
Majority 19,383 32.8 +8.6
Turnout 59,147 69.9 -0.9
Conservative hold Swing +4.3
General election 2017: Huntingdon[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 32,915 55.1 +2.1
Labour Nik Johnson 18,440 30.9 +12.6
Liberal Democrats Rod Cantrill 5,090 8.5 +0.7
UKIP Paul Bullen 2,180 3.7 -13.2
Green Thomas MacLennan 1,095 1.8 -2.1
Majority 14,475 24.2 -10.5
Turnout 59,720 70.8 +2.9
Conservative hold Swing -5.2
General election 2015: Huntingdon[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 29,652 53.0 +4.1
Labour Nik Johnson[18] 10,248 18.3 +7.3
UKIP Paul Bullen[18] 9,473 16.9 +10.9
Liberal Democrats Rod Cantrill[19] 4,375 7.8 −21.1
Green Thomas MacLennan[20] 2,178 3.9 +2.7
Majority 19,404 34.7 +15.8
Turnout 55,926 67.9 +3.0
Conservative hold Swing −1.6
General election 2010: Huntingdon[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 26,516 48.9 −1.9
Liberal Democrats Martin Land 15,697 28.9 +2.3
Labour Anthea Cox 5,982 11.0 −7.4
UKIP Ian Curtis 3,258 6.0 +1.8
Independent Jonathan Salt[22] 1,432 2.6 New
Green John Clare 652 1.2 New
Monster Raving Loony Lord Toby Jug[23] 548 1.0 New
Animal Protection Carrie Holliman 181 0.3 New
Majority 10,819 19.9 -4.2
Turnout 54,266 64.9 +2.3
Conservative hold Swing −2.1

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Huntingdon
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 26,646 50.8 +0.9
Liberal Democrats Julian Huppert 13,799 26.3 +2.4
Labour Stephen Sartain 9,821 18.7 −4.1
UKIP Derek Norman 2,152 4.1 +0.7
Majority 12,847 24.5 −1.5
Turnout 52,418 62.5 +1.4
Conservative hold Swing −0.8
General election 2001: Huntingdon
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Djanogly 24,507 49.9 −5.4
Liberal Democrats Michael Pope 11,715 23.9 +9.2
Labour Takki Sulaiman 11,211 22.8 −0.7
UKIP Derek Norman 1,656 3.4 +2.8
Majority 12,792 26.0 −5.8
Turnout 49,089 61.1 −13.8
Conservative hold Swing −7.3

Elections in the 1990s

The constituency underwent boundary changes prior to the 1997 election and the changes are not based on the 1992 result.

General election 1997: Huntingdon
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Major 31,501 55.3 −9.9
Labour Jason Reece 13,361 23.5 +6.6
Liberal Democrats Matthew Owen 8,390 14.7 −6.4
Referendum David Bellamy 3,114 5.5 New
UKIP Charles Coyne 331 0.6 New
Christian Democrat Veronica Hufford 177 0.3 New
Independent Duncan Robertson 89 0.2 New
Majority 18,140 31.8 −6.8
Turnout 56,963 74.9 −4.3
Conservative hold Swing −8.25

General election 1992: Huntingdon[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Major 48,662 66.2 +2.6
Labour Hugh Seckleman 12,432 16.9 +3.0
Liberal Democrats Andrew Duff 9,386 12.8 −8.3
Liberal Paul Wiggin 1,045 1.4 New
Green Deborah Birkhead 846 1.2 −0.2
Monster Raving Loony Screaming Lord Sutch 728 1.0 New
Conservative Thatcherite Michael Flanagan 231 0.3 New
Gremloids Lord Buckethead 107 0.1 New
Forward to Mars Party Charles S. Cockell 91 0.1 New
Natural Law David Shepherd 26 0.0 New
Majority 36,230 49.3 +6.8
Turnout 73,554 79.2 +5.2
Conservative hold Swing −0.2

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Huntingdon[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Major 40,530 63.6 +1.2
SDP Anthony Nicholson 13,486 21.1 -4.2
Labour David Brown 8,883 13.9 +2.4
Green William Lavin 874 1.4 +0.6
Majority 27,044 42.5 +5.4
Turnout 63,773 74.0 +2.4
Conservative hold Swing

General election 1983: Huntingdon[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Major 34,254 62.4
Liberal Sheila Gatiss 13,906 25.3
Labour Mark Slater 6,317 11.5
Ecology Timothy Eiloart 444 0.8
Majority 20,348 37.1
Turnout 54,921 71.6
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1910s

General election 1910 (December): Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Cator 2,287 51.7 −2.3
Liberal Oliver Brett 2,139 48.3 +2.3
Majority 148 3.4 -4.6
Turnout 4,426 85.5 −2.7
Conservative hold Swing −2.3
General election 1910 (January): Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Cator 2,466 54.0 +9.4
Liberal Oliver Brett 2,099 46.0 −9.4
Majority 367 8.0 N/A
Turnout 4,565 88.2 +5.1
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +9.4

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Samuel Whitbread 2,426 55.4 +8.9
Conservative John Cator 1,957 44.6 −8.9
Majority 469 10.8 N/A
Turnout 4,383 83.1 +7.3
Registered electors 5,272
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +8.9
General election 1900: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Montagu 2,118 53.5 0.4
Liberal Charles Adeane 1,838 46.5 +0.4
Majority 280 7.0 0.8
Turnout 3,956 75.8 6.8
Registered electors 5,222
Conservative hold Swing 0.4

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Arthur Smith-Barry 2,419 53.9 +3.7
Liberal John Jackson Wilks 2,068 46.1 −3.7
Majority 351 7.8 +7.4
Turnout 4,487 82.6 +0.8
Registered electors 5,435
Conservative hold Swing +3.7
General election 1892: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Arthur Smith-Barry 2,251 50.2 −1.6
Liberal Samuel Whitbread 2,229 49.8 +1.6
Majority 22 0.4 3.2
Turnout 4,480 81.8 +3.2
Registered electors 5,479
Conservative hold Swing −1.6

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Arthur Smith-Barry 2,302 51.8 +3.4
Liberal Thomas Coote 2,141 48.2 −3.4
Majority 161 3.6 N/A
Turnout 4,443 78.6 −2.1
Registered electors 5,655
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.4
General election 1885: Huntingdon[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Thomas Coote 2,354 51.6 N/A
Conservative Oliver George Powlett Montagu 2,208 48.4 N/A
Majority 146 3.2 N/A
Turnout 4,562 80.7 N/A
Registered electors 5,655
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
By-election, 22 Mar 1884: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Robert Peel 455 50.5 N/A
Liberal Charles Veasey[27] 446 49.5 New
Majority 9 1.0 N/A
Turnout 901 24.6 N/A
Registered electors 3,658
Conservative hold Swing N/A
  • Caused by Montagu's succession to the peerage, becoming Earl of Sandwich.
General election 1880: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Edward Montagu Unopposed
Registered electors 1,052
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1870s

By-election, 16 Feb 1876: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Edward Montagu Unopposed
Conservative hold
  • Caused by Karslake's resignation.
By-election, 16 Mar 1874: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Burgess Karslake Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1874: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Burgess Karslake Unopposed
Registered electors 1,049
Conservative hold
By-election, 20 Dec 1873: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Burgess Karslake 499 59.4 N/A
Liberal Arthur Arnold 341 40.6 New
Majority 158 18.8 N/A
Turnout 840 83.3 N/A
Registered electors 1,008
Conservative hold
  • Caused by Baring's death.

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Registered electors 976
Conservative hold

Seat reduced to one member

By-election, 11 July 1866: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1865: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 383
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1859: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 378
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
By-election, 4 March 1858: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1857: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 382
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1852: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 390
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1847: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 373
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
By-election, 22 April 1844: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Thomas Baring Unopposed
Conservative hold
  • Caused by Pollock's resignation upon his appointment as Chief Justice of the Court of the Exchequer
By-election, 14 September 1841: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Pollock Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1841: Huntingdon[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Pollock Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 416
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1837: Huntingdon[14][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Pollock Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 356
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1835: Huntingdon[14][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Pollock Unopposed
Conservative Jonathan Peel Unopposed
Registered electors 380
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1832: Huntingdon[14][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Jonathan Peel 177 31.1 15.2
Tory Frederick Pollock 171 30.0 16.3
Whig James Duberley 128 22.5 +19.1
Whig Edward Harvey Maltby[28] 94 16.5 +12.4
Majority 43 7.5 34.7
Turnout 287 87.8 c.+46.7
Registered electors 327
Tory hold Swing 15.5
Tory hold Swing 16.0
General election 1831: Huntingdon[13][29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Tory Jonathan Peel 68 46.3
Tory Frederick Pollock 68 46.3
Whig Samuel Wells 6 4.1
Whig James Duberley 5 3.4
Majority 62 42.2
Turnout 74 c.41.1
Registered electors c.180
Tory hold
Tory hold
General election 1830: Huntingdon[13][29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Tory John Calvert (died 1844) Unopposed
Tory James Stuart Unopposed
Whig Samuel Wells
Whig Henry Sweeting
Registered electors c.180
Tory hold
Tory hold

Wells and Sweeting were put forward as candidates, and received "a show of hands of ten to one" against Calvert and Stuart, who had received seven and five respectively. However, the mayor declared Stuart and Calvert as having the majority of legal votes and the seat was not put to a poll.[29]

See also


Notes and references


Notes
  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years, though this was not the case in its first creation
References
  1. "England Parliamentary electorates 2010-2018". Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. "'Huntingdon', June 1983 up to May 1997". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Archived from the original on 12 March 2016. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  3. "H.M.S.O. Boundary Commission Report 1868, Huntingdon". www.visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  4. "H.M.S.O. Boundary Commission Report 1885, Huntingdonshire". www.visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  5. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1983". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  6. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1995". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  7. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  8. "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  9. "History of Parliament". Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  10. "History of Parliament". Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  11. "History of Parliament". Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  12. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "H" (part 4)
  13. Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 151–153. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  14. Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book) |format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  15. https://www.huntingdonshire.gov.uk/media/4060/statement-of-persons-nominated-_-notice-of-poll-huntingdon-12-december-2019.pdf
  16. "Candidates standing in the General Election in Cambridgeshire".
  17. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  18. "UK Election Results: Huntingdon 2015".
  19. "mgUserInfo.aspx?UID=123". Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  20. "Prospective General Election Candidates".
  21. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  22. http://www.jonathansalt.co.uk Archived 14 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  23. Local Radio station Star 107[permanent dead link]
  24. "UK General Election results April 1992". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  25. "British Parliamentary Election results 1983-97: English Counties". www.election.demon.co.uk.
  26. F. W. S. Craig (1989), British Parliamentary Election Results, 1885–1918. Aldershot: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 299
  27. "Election of Sir R. Peel for Huntingdon". Edinburgh Evening News. 22 March 1884. p. 4. Retrieved 1 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  28. "Huntingdon and Godmanchester Election". Huntingdon, Bedford & Peterborough Gazette. 15 December 1832. p. 1. Retrieved 16 April 2020 via British Newspaper Archive.
  29. Harratt, Simon. "Huntingdon". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 16 April 2020.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Blaby
Constituency represented by the Chancellor of the Exchequer
1989–1990
Succeeded by
Kingston-upon-Thames
Preceded by
Finchley
Constituency represented by the Prime Minister
1990–1997
Succeeded by
Sedgefield
Preceded by
Sedgefield
Constituency represented by the Leader of the Opposition
1997–1997
Succeeded by
Richmond, Yorks