Ileum

The ileum (/ˈɪliəm/) is the final section of the small intestine in most higher vertebrates, including mammals, reptiles, and birds. In fish, the divisions of the small intestine are not as clear and the terms posterior intestine or distal intestine may be used instead of ileum.[2] Its main function is to absorb vitamin B12, bile salts, and whatever products of digestion that were not absorbed by the jejunum.

Ileum
Small intestine
The cecal fossa. The ileum and cecum are drawn backward and upward.
Details
Precursormidgut
Arteryileal arteries
Veinileal veins
Nerveceliac ganglia, vagus[1]
Identifiers
LatinIleum
MeSHD007082
TA98A05.6.04.001
TA22959
FMA7208
Anatomical terminology
Ileocecal junction (terminal ileum appears in brown)

The ileum follows the duodenum and jejunum and is separated from the cecum by the ileocecal valve (ICV). In humans, the ileum is about 2–4 m long, and the pH is usually between 7 and 8 (neutral or slightly basic).

Ileum is derived from the Greek word eilein, meaning "to twist up tightly".[citation needed]


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