Independence Day (United States)

Independence Day (colloquially the Fourth of July) is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States, on July 4, 1776. The Continental Congress declared that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject (and subordinate) to the monarch of Britain, King George III, and were now united, free, and independent states.[1] The Congress had voted to declare independence two days earlier, on July 2, but it was not declared until July 4.[1]

Independence Day
Displays of fireworks, such as these over the Washington Monument in 1986, take place across the United States on Independence Day.
Also calledThe Fourth of July
Observed by United States
TypeNational
SignificanceThe day in 1776 that the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress
CelebrationsFireworks, family reunions, concerts, barbecues, picnics, parades, baseball games
DateJuly 4
Next timeJuly 4, 2022 (2022-07-04)
FrequencyAnnual

Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, political speeches, and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the national day of the United States.[2][3][4]