International organization

An international organization (also known as an intergovernmental organization or an international institution) is a stable set of norms and rules meant to govern the behavior of states and other actors in the international system.[2][3] Organizations may be established by a treaty or be an instrument governed by international law and possessing its own legal personality, such as the United Nations, the World Health Organization and NATO.[4][5] International organizations are composed of primarily member states, but may also include other entities, such as other international organizations. Additionally, entities (including states) may hold observer status.[6]

The offices of the United Nations in Geneva (Switzerland), which is the city that hosts the highest number of international organizations in the world.[1]

Notable examples include the United Nations (UN), Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), Bank for International Settlements (BIS), Council of Europe (COE), International Labour Organization (ILO) and International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL).[7]


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