Inverse function

In mathematics, the inverse function of a function f (also called the inverse of f) is a function that undoes the operation of f. The inverse of f exists if and only if f is bijective, and if it exists, is denoted by

A function f and its inverse f −1. Because f maps a to 3, the inverse f −1 maps 3 back to a.

For a function , its inverse admits an explicit description: it sends each element to the unique element such that f(x) = y.

As an example, consider the real-valued function of a real variable given by f(x) = 5x − 7. One can think of f as the function which multiplies its input by 5 then subtracts 7 from the result. To undo this, one adds 7 to the input, then divides the result by 5. Therefore, the inverse of f is the function defined by


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Inverse function, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.