Ivor Vivian


Ivor Francis Vivian (born 1932) is a former Australian politician.

Vivian was born in Newton Abbot, Devon, England in 1932.[1] From 1969 to 1998, he was the foundation principal lecturer in mathematics at the Canberra College of Advanced Education, renamed in 1990 as the University of Canberra.[2] In 1995 he was awarded a 25-year service pin.[3]

In 1973, he was appointed to Australian Capital Territory Advisory Council.[4]

In 1975, he was elected to the newly created Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly as one of the nine members representing the electorate of Fraser for the centrist Australia Party.[2][5] He was one of two Australia Party members elected to the Legislative Assembly, the other being Maureen Worsley, who was elected as a member for the electorate for Canberra. Gordon Walsh was a Labor member of the Assembly. In 1977 he resigned from Labor, and from the Assembly, and joined the Australia Party.[6] Vivian and Walsh both joined the Australian Democrats on its formation later in 1977. Worsley sat out the rest of her term as an Independent.

Vivian and Walsh were both elected to the renamed House of Assembly in 1979,[7][8] but Vivian failed to be re-elected in 1982, leaving Walsh as the only remaining Democrat. He served as the deputy president of the Assembly and deputy chairman of committees.[4] He also served on the ACT Interim Schools Authority, Road Safety Council, Third Party Premiums Committee and was chairman of the Police Liaison Committee. The House of Assembly was abolished in 1986, and replaced in 1989 with the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly. Neither Vivian nor Walsh stood for election to the new Legislative Assembly.[4]

Vivian is a priest of the Liberal Catholic Church, and was vicar of St Thomas' church in the Canberra suburb of Melba.[2][9]

He was involved in the establishment of Radio 1RPH, a radio station for people with a print disability.[2][10]

References


  1. Newton Abbot GRO district June 1932 quarter Vol 5b page 186
  2. "Ivor Vivian, 20 years on, follows political way to spiritual home". The Canberra Times. 68 (21, 405). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 22 November 1993. p. 16. Retrieved 19 November 2020 via National Library of Australia.
  3. "University of Canberra Minutes of Council Meeting No 37, 22 February 1995" (PDF). Retrieved 18 November 2020.
  4. "The Democrat candidates". The Canberra Times. 56 (17, 042). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 26 May 1982. p. 20. Retrieved 19 November 2020 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "Australian Capital Territory House of Assembly Elections – Division of Fraser". Australian Government Gazette. Special (83B). Australia. 11 October 1974. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2020 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "Four to decide party fate". The Canberra Times. 52 (14, 920). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 1 November 1977. p. 8. Retrieved 19 November 2020 via National Library of Australia.
  7. "Australian Capital Territory House of Assembly Elections – Division of Fraser". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. Special (S113). Australia. 20 June 1979. p. 1. Retrieved 19 November 2020 via National Library of Australia.
  8. "Australian Democrats: Our History". Retrieved 18 November 2020.
  9. "St Thomas' Liberal Catholic Church Clergy". Retrieved 15 November 2020.
  10. "Radio 1RPH: Our History". Retrieved 18 November 2020.