Jejunum

The jejunum is the second part of the small intestine in humans and most higher vertebrates, including mammals, reptiles, and birds. Its lining is specialised for the absorption by enterocytes of small nutrient molecules which have been previously digested by enzymes in the duodenum.

Jejunum
Small intestine
Superior and inferior duodenal fossæ.
Details
Pronunciation/ɪˈnəm/[1][2]
Precursormidgut
Part ofSmall intestine
SystemDigestive system
Arteryjejunal arteries
Veinjejunal veins
Nerveceliac ganglia, vagus[3]
Identifiers
LatinJejunum
MeSHD007583
TA98A05.6.03.001
TA22958
FMA7207
Anatomical terminology

The jejunum lies between the duodenum and the ileum and is considered to start at the suspensory muscle of the duodenum, a location called the duodenojejunal flexure.[4] The division between the jejunum and ileum is not anatomically distinct.[5] In adult humans, the small intestine is usually 6–7 m (20–23 ft) long (post mortem), about two-fifths of which (about 2.5 m (8.2 ft)) is the jejunum.[4]


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