Khmer language

Khmer (/kmɛər, kəˈmɛər/;[3] ខ្មែរ, Khmêr [kʰmae]) is an Austroasiatic language spoken by the Khmer people, and the official and national language of Cambodia. With approximately 16 million speakers, it is the second most widely spoken Austroasiatic language (after Vietnamese). Khmer has been influenced considerably by Sanskrit and Pali, especially in the royal and religious registers, through Hinduism and Buddhism. It is also the earliest recorded and earliest written language of the Mon–Khmer family, predating Mon and Vietnamese,[4] due to Old Khmer being the language of the historical empires of Chenla, Angkor and, presumably, their earlier predecessor state, Funan.

Khmer
Cambodian
ភាសាខ្មែរ / ខេមរភាសា
Phéasa Khmêr ("Khmer language") written in Khmer script
Pronunciation [pʰiəsaː kʰmae]
[kʰeːmarapʰiəsaː]
Native toCambodia
Thailand (East and Isan)
Vietnam (Mekong Delta and Southeast)
EthnicityKhmers
Native speakers
16 million (2007)[1]
Austroasiatic
  • Khmeric
    • Khmer
Early forms
Khmer script
Khmer Braille
Official status
Official language in
 Cambodia
 ASEAN[2]
Recognised minority
language in
Language codes
ISO 639-1km Central Khmer
ISO 639-2khm Central Khmer
ISO 639-3Either:
khm  Khmer
kxm  Northern Khmer
Glottologkhme1253  Khmeric
cent1989  Central Khmer
Linguasphere46-FBA-a
  Khmer
A Khmer speaker.

The vast majority of Khmer speakers speak Central Khmer, the dialect of the central plain where the Khmer are most heavily concentrated. Within Cambodia, regional accents exist in remote areas but these are regarded as varieties of Central Khmer. Two exceptions are the speech of the capital, Phnom Penh, and that of the Khmer Khe in Stung Treng province, both of which differ sufficiently enough from Central Khmer to be considered separate dialects of Khmer.

Outside of Cambodia, three distinct dialects are spoken by ethnic Khmers native to areas that were historically part of the Khmer Empire. The Northern Khmer dialect is spoken by over a million Khmers in the southern regions of Northeast Thailand and is treated by some linguists as a separate language. Khmer Krom, or Southern Khmer, is the first language of the Khmer of Vietnam while the Khmer living in the remote Cardamom mountains speak a very conservative dialect that still displays features of the Middle Khmer language.

Khmer is primarily an analytic, isolating language. There are no inflections, conjugations or case endings. Instead, particles and auxiliary words are used to indicate grammatical relationships. General word order is subject–verb–object, and modifiers follow the word they modify. Classifiers appear after numbers when used to count nouns, though not always so consistently as in languages like Chinese. In spoken Khmer, topic-comment structure is common and the perceived social relation between participants determines which sets of vocabulary, such as pronouns and honorifics, are proper.

Khmer differs from neighboring languages such as Thai, Burmese, Lao, and even Vietnamese which is in the same family in that it is not a tonal language. Words are stressed on the final syllable, hence many words conform to the typical Mon–Khmer pattern of a stressed syllable preceded by a minor syllable. The language has been written in the Khmer script, an abugida descended from the Brahmi script via the southern Indian Pallava script, since at least the seventh century. The script's form and use has evolved over the centuries; its modern features include subscripted versions of consonants used to write clusters and a division of consonants into two series with different inherent vowels. Approximately 79% of Cambodians are able to read Khmer.[5]