Lens (anatomy)

The lens, or crystalline lens, is a transparent biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. By changing shape, it functions to change the focal length of the eye so that it can focus on objects at various distances, thus allowing a sharp real image of the object of interest to be formed on the retina. This adjustment of the lens is known as accommodation (see also below). Accommodation is similar to the focusing of a photographic camera via movement of its lenses. The lens is flatter on its anterior side than on its posterior side.

Lens
Light from a single point of a distant object and light from a single point of a near object being brought to a focus by changing the curvature of the lens.
Schematic diagram of the human eye.
Details
Part ofEyeball
SystemVisual system
FunctionRefract light
Identifiers
Latinlens crystallin
MeSHD007908
TA98A15.2.05.001
TA26798
FMA58241
Anatomical terminology

In humans, the refractive power of the lens in its natural environment is approximately 18 dioptres, roughly one-third of the eye's total power.


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