List of equipment used by separatist forces of the war in Donbas


This is a list of equipment of the Separatist forces of the war in Donbas currently used in the war in Donbas.

Small Arms


Pistols

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
Makarov PM[1]Semi-automatic pistol9×18mm Makarov Soviet Union8-round magazine. Most commonly used NAF pistol.
Stechkin APS[1]Machine pistol9×18mm Makarov Soviet Union20-round magazine.
Tokarev TT-33[1]Semi-automatic pistol7.62×25 mm Tokarev Soviet Union8-round magazine. Limited usage.

Bolt-action rifles

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
Mosin–Nagant M1891/30[1]Bolt-action rifle7.62×54mmR Soviet Union5-round magazine, some NAF members equip it with a PU scope to become a sniper rifle.[1] Limited usage.

Carbines

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
SKS[1]Semi-automatic carbine7.62×39mm M43 Soviet Union10-round magazine.
AKS-74U[2]Carbine5.45×39mm M74 Soviet Union30-round magazine.
M4 carbine[1]Carbine5.56×45mm NATO United StatesCaptured M4 carbines were displayed by the Sparta Battalion in the Donetsk Airport on January 18, 2015. It is not in the inventory of the Ukrainian Armed Forces, and claimed by the DPR to have been used by Georgian mercenaries in the battle.[3][4] In storage due to lack of ammo.

Submachine guns

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
PPSh-41[1]Submachine gun7.62×25mm Tokarev Soviet Union35-round box magazine and 71-round drum magazine. Limited usage in the beginning of the conflict.[1]
PPS-43[1]Submachine gun7.62×25mm Tokarev Soviet Union35-round box magazine. Limited usage in the beginning of the conflict.[1]

Assault rifles

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
AKM / AKS[1]Assault rifle7.62×39mm M43 Soviet Union30-round magazine.
AKMS[1]Assault rifle7.62×39mm M43 Soviet Union30-round magazine.
AK-74[1]Assault rifle5.45×39mm M74 Soviet Union30-round magazine.
AK-74M[1]Assault rifle5.45×39mm M74 Russia30-round magazine. Limited usage and have GP-30 attached.
AKS-74[1]Assault rifle5.45×39mm M74 Soviet Union30-round magazine.
AS ValAssault rifle9×39mm Soviet UnionIt is produced in Russia and is not known to be in the inventory of the Ukrainian Armed Forces.
Filmed as carried by rebels in Luhansk in January 2015.[5]

Sniper rifles

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
Dragunov SVD[1]Sniper rifle7.62×54mmR Soviet Union10-round magazine.
VSS Vintorez[1]Sniper rifle9x39mm Soviet Union10, 20 round magazine.

Anti-materiel rifles

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
PTRD[1]Anti-tank rifle14.5×114mm Soviet UnionSingle-shot reloadable rifle.
PTRS-41[1]Anti-tank rifle14.5×114mm Soviet Union5-round magazine.
KSVK / ASVK[1]Anti-materiel rifle12.7×108mm RussiaIntroduced for service with Russian forces in 2013. Any exports on this rifle is unknown. The weapon is not in the inventories of Ukrainian government forces, and has not otherwise been documented in the hands of a non-state armed group.[1]

Machine guns

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
RPD[1]Light machine gun7.62×39mm Soviet Union100-round drum magazine.
RPK[1]Light machine gun7.62×39mm Soviet Union40-round capacity box magazine or 75-round drum magazine.
RPK-74[1] / RPK-74M[6]Light machine gun5.45×39mm M74 Soviet Union30 or 45-round magazine.
PK / PKM[1]General-purpose machine gun7.62×54mmR Soviet UnionBelt fed with 100, 200 or 250-round boxes. In Ukraine, the PKM is produced under the name KM-7.62.
PKP "Pecheneg"[1]General-purpose machine gun7.62×54mmR RussiaPKP is not known to be in service with Ukrainian forces, and has only been exported outside of Russia in limited quantities.[1]
DShK[1]Heavy machine gun12.7×108mm Soviet UnionBelt fed with 50-round boxes.
KPV / KPVT[1]Heavy machine gun14.5×114mm Soviet UnionBelt fed with 40 or 50-round boxes.
NSV / NSVT[1]Heavy machine gun12.7×108mm Soviet UnionBelt fed with 50-round boxes. In Ukraine, the NSV is produced under the name KM-12.7 or KT-12.7.

Explosives/armor-piercing weapons


Grenades and grenade launchers

Name Type Diameter Origin Photo Notes
RG-41[1]Fragmentation grenade55mm Soviet Union
5 meter kill radius. Limited usage.
F-1Fragmentation grenade55mm Soviet UnionReported to be bombarded on government forces using multirotor UAVs by pro-Russian separatists.[7]
RGD-5[1]Fragmentation grenade58mm Soviet UnionPropels ~350 fragments, 5 meter kill radius, 3.2-4 second fuse.
RGN[1]Fragmentation grenade60mm Soviet Union4-10 meter kill radius, 3.2-4.2 second fuse.
GP-25[1]Under-barrel grenade launcher40mm Soviet UnionCan be fitted to AK type rifles.
AGS-17[1][8]Automatic grenade launcher30mm Soviet UnionBelt fed with 29-round drums, high rate of fire.

Mines

Name Type Detonation Origin Photo Notes
MON-50[9]Anti-personnel mineTripwire/Command Soviet UnionPropels ~485/540 steel projectiles to a kill radius of 50 meters.
MON-90[9]Anti-personnel mineTripwire/Command Soviet UnionPropels ~2000 steel projectiles to a kill radius of 90 meters.
OZM-72[9]Anti-personnel bounding mineTripwire/Command Soviet Union~500g TNT, propels ~2400 steel projectiles.
MON-100[9]Anti-personnel minePressure Soviet UnionPropels ~400 steel projectiles to a kill radius of 100 meters.
TM-62M[1]Anti-tank minePressure Soviet Union7.5 kg TNT.

Anti-tank

Name Type Diameter Origin Photo Notes
RPG-7[1]Rocket-propelled grenadeWarhead diameter varies Soviet UnionReloadable launcher.
TBG-7VThermobaric warhead for RPG-793mm RussiaProduced in Russia and never exported to Ukraine.[10]
RPG-18[1]Rocket-propelled grenade64mm Soviet UnionSome of these launchers captured from the separatists were evidently brought from Russia.[1]
RPG-22[1]Rocket-propelled grenade72.5mm Soviet UnionSingle-shot disposable launcher.
RPG-26[1]Rocket-propelled grenade72.5mm Soviet UnionSingle-shot disposable launcher.
SPG-9[1]Recoilless rifle73mm Soviet UnionSingle-shot reloadable launcher.
9K111 Fagot[1]Anti-tank missile120mm Soviet UnionWire-guided anti-tank missile system.
9K115 Metis[1]Anti-tank missile94mm Soviet UnionWire-guided anti-tank missile system.
9K114 Shturm[1]Anti-tank missile130mm Soviet UnionWire-guided anti-tank missile system.
9M133 Kornet[1]Anti-tank missile152mm RussiaThe system components were found discarded on a battlefield near Starobesheve.[citation needed] It has not been exported to Ukraine.[1][11]

Flamethrowers

Name Type Diameter Origin Photo Notes
RPO-A Shmel[1]Rocket-propelled flamethrower93mm Soviet UnionSome of the launchers captured from the separatists were evidently produced in Russia in 2000s.[1]
MRO-A[12]Rocket-propelled flamethrower72.5mm RussiaIt is not known to have been exported outside of Russia.[1]

Vehicles


The ongoing war makes the list below include tentative estimates.

Tanks

T-72BM is not known to have been exported from Russia to any other country.[13][14]
One seen in convoy in Sverdlovsk.[14] Two were destroyed in Starobesheve (one T-72BA and one either T-72BM or another T-72BA[6][11][15]).

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
IS-3Heavy tank0 Soviet UnionRebels managed to repair an IS-3 on a World War 2 monument, though the main gun did not function.[16][17] The tank was later captured by Ukrainian forces.
T-54Medium tank1 Soviet UnionTaken from Donetsk historical museum on July 7, 2014.[18]
T-64/A/B/BV/BMMain battle tank46+ Soviet UnionAround 46 captured from Ukrainian forces according to the DPR and Russia.[unreliable source?][19] Some were reportedly supplied from Russia.[13][20]
T-72B[1]/B1/BMMain battle tank39+ Soviet UnionThree T-72B1 were seen in a convoy in Sverdlovsk.[14]
I[21][unreliable source?] Six seen in the 2015 Donetsk Victory Day Parade.[22] More than 34 were reportedly supplied from Russia.[unreliable source?][23]

Infantry fighting vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BMP-1 / BMP-1P / BMP-1KSh[1]Infantry fighting vehicle27+ Soviet UnionAround 27 captured from Ukrainian forces during the Battle of Debaltseve.[unreliable source?] Some were reportedly supplied from Russia.[unreliable source?]
BMP-2[1] / BMP-2K / BMP-2DInfantry fighting vehicle108+ Soviet UnionAround 108 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?] Some were reportedly supplied from Russia.[unreliable source?]
BMD-1[1]Airborne infantry fighting vehicle1 Soviet UnionOne captured from the 25th Airborne Brigade Limited usage.
BMD-2[1]Airborne infantry fighting vehicleN/A Soviet UnionOne captured from the 25th Airborne Brigade in April 2014 in Sloviansk. Two captured from Ukrainian Airmobile forces and two lost to them in July–September 2014. Limited usage

Armored personnel carriers

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BTR-60PB[1] / BTR-60R-145BMArmored personnel carrier4 Soviet UnionFour captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
BTR-70[1]Armored personnel carrier14 Soviet Union14 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
BTR-80[1]Armored personnel carrier30 Soviet Union30 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?] Some were reportedly supplied from Russia.[24]
MT-LB[1]Armored personnel carrier32 Soviet Union32 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?] Some were reportedly supplied from Russia.[unreliable source?]
MT-LBuArmored personnel carrier3 Soviet Union3 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
MT-LBVM[1]Armored personnel carrier1+ Russia[1]At least one destroyed near Ilovaisk.[6]
MT-LBVMK[1]Armored personnel carrier1+ Russia[1]At least one destroyed in Ukraine in September 2014.[6]
MT-LB 6MA[1]Armored personnel carrier1+ Russia[1]At least one destroyed near Ilovaisk.[6]
BTR-7 (BTR-70DI)Armored personnel carrier1 UkraineOne captured from Ukrainian forces near Ridkodub, Shakhtarsk Raion.[unreliable source?]
BTR-4K/E[1]Armored personnel carrier3 UkraineThree captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?] One BTR-4K captured by the Vostok Battalion from the National Guard of Ukraine.[unreliable source?]
BTR-82AM[1]Armored personnel carrier[1]1+ RussiaIt was only adopted in Russia in early 2013. It is not known to have been exported to any other country.[1][6]

Seen on videos filmed by the separatists.[6] Also seen destroyed in Novosvitlivka.[25][unreliable source?]

Armored scout vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BRDM-2Amphibious armoured scout carN/A Soviet Union
9P148Anti-tank guided missile launcher vehicle4 Soviet Union4 maybe captured from Ukrainian forces near Debaltseve.[unreliable source?]
BRM-1K[1]Combat reconnaissance vehicle15 Soviet Union15 captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
PRP-4Artillery reconnaissance vehicle2 Soviet UnionTwo captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]

Armored recovery vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BREM-1[1]Armored recovery vehicle2 Soviet UnionTwo captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
IMR-2[1]Armored recovery vehicle2 Soviet UnionTwo captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
VT-72BArmored recovery vehicle1 CzechoslovakiaOne captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
BTS-4[1]Armored recovery vehicle1 UkraineOne captured from Ukrainian forces in the Debaltseve cauldron on 21 February 2015.[unreliable source?]

Military engineering vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BAT-MMilitary engineering vehicle1 Soviet UnionCaptured near Debaltseve.
BAT-2Combat engineering vehicle3 Soviet UnionThree captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]

Minelayers

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
GMZ-3[6]Minelayer1 Soviet UnionOne captured from Ukrainian forces near Dzerkalne, Amvrosiivka Raion on 5 September 2014.[unreliable source?]

Trenchers

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
MDK-3[6]Trencher1 Soviet UnionOne captured from Ukrainian forces.[6]

Logistics and utility vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
UAZ-469Light utility vehicle2+ Soviet UnionTwo seen north of Sloviansk.[26][unreliable source?]
HumveeHigh-mobility multipurpose vehicle1+ United StatesCaptured in Debaltsevo after being abandoned by Ukrainian forces.[27]
UAZ-23632-148 Esaul Armoured utility vehicle 15+  Russia Photographed by OSCE monitors using a drone at a training area in April 2021.

[28][29]

GAZ VodnikInfantry mobility vehicle1+ RussiaSeen in Krasnodon.[30][31][unreliable source?]
SpartanLight armored vehicle1 UkraineOne captured from the Azov Battalion.[unreliable source?]
BPM-97[32] / Dozor / Dozor-N / VystrelLight armored vehicle10+ RussiaFour seen in the late December LPR military exercises.[33][unreliable source?]
10 vehicles seen in Krasnodon,[30][unreliable source?] several seen in Luhansk.[34][35][unreliable source?]
Ural-4320Medium cargo truckN/A Soviet Union
KamAZ-4310Medium cargo truck80+[36] Soviet Union
KamAZ-65117Medium cargo truckN/A Russia
PTS-2[1]Amphibious transporter21 Soviet UnionAbout 25 were restored from a Lugansk military warehouse.[citation needed] Four captured by Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
Can-Am all terrain vehicleAll-terrain vehicle1+ CanadaSeen in Donetsk victory day parade in 2019.

Artillery


Mortars

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
82-BM-37[1]82mm infantry mortarN/A Soviet UnionAt least two reported captured from pro-Russian rebels by Ukrainian Force.[37]
120-PM-43 mortar[1]120-mm infantry mortarN/A Soviet Union
2S12 Sani[37]120mm heavy mortarN/A Soviet UnionAt least two reported captured from pro-Russian rebels by Ukrainian Forces.[37]
2B14 Podnos[8]82mm infantry mortarN/A Soviet UnionCaptured from Ukrainian forces.
2B9 Vasilek[38]82mm automatic mortarN/A Soviet Union4-mortar shell cassette.
RM-3850mm infantry mortar1 Soviet UnionUsed by the LPR militia, one taken from a warehouse with World War 2 weaponry.

Field artillery

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
D-20152mm howitzer2 Soviet UnionObserved by OSCE SMM in violation of withdrawal lines.[39]
D-30[1] "Lyagushka"122mm towed howitzer35+[40][41] Soviet UnionObserved by OSCE SMM in violation of withdrawal lines.[39]
MT-12 "Rapira"[1]100mm anti-tank gun21+ Soviet UnionObserved by OSCE SMM in violation of withdrawal lines.[39]
2B16 Nona-K[1]120mm anti-tank gun3+ Soviet UnionAt least three documented in use by the separatists. Ukraine reportedly had only two of these before the war.[42]
2A65 "Msta-B"[1]152mm Howitzer19+ Soviet UnionObserved by OSCE SMM in violation of withdrawal lines.[39]
BS-3[1]100mm anti-tank gun1 Soviet UnionUsed by the LPR militia, one taken from a warehouse with World War 2 weaponry.

Self-propelled field artillery

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
2S1 Gvozdika[1]122mm self-propelled howitzer11 Soviet UnionFound in numerous places, including Miusinsk along with other weapons brought from Russia. Presence confirmed by OSCE monitoring.[43][44][39]
2S3 Akatsiya[1]152.4mm self-propelled artillery7 Soviet UnionObserved by OSCE SMM in violation of withdrawal lines.[39]
2S5 Giatsint-S[1]152mm self-propelled field gun1 Soviet UnionOne captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
2S7 Pion203 mm self-propelled artillery2+ Soviet UnionTwo seen in Makiivka.[45][46]
2S9 Nona-S[1]120mm self-propelled mortar2 Soviet UnionOne captured from the 25th Airborne Brigade. One captured by Ukrainian forces on 5 July 2014.[unreliable source?]
2S19 Msta-S[1]152mm self-propelled howitzer3+ Soviet UnionTwo reportedly captured from Ukrainian forces.[unreliable source?]
One more is suspected to come from Russia.[35][unreliable source?]
2S4 Tyulpan240mm self-propelled mortar1+ Soviet UnionOne mortar was observed by OSCE in 2015.[47]

Rocket artillery

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
BM-21 "Grad" (9K51)[1][48]122mm multiple rocket launcher18+ Soviet Union18 claimed to be captured from Ukrainian forces after battles near the border with Russia.[49][unreliable source?]
Grad-K[32] ("Grad" on KamAZ-5350 chassis)122mm multiple rocket launcherN/A RussiaThe 2B26 machine is a Russian modification of the original BM-21 launcher. It was first produced in 2011.[50][unreliable source?] It is seen on a video with separatists firing Grads in January 2015.[32][51][unreliable source?] [52]
Grad-P122mm light portable rocket systemN/A Soviet UnionSeveral seen in several Luhansk region areas.[53]
BM-27 Uragan220mm multiple rocket launcher2+ Soviet UnionTwo seen in Khartsyzk in February 2015.[54]
BM-30 Smerch300mm multiple rocket launcher2+ Soviet UnionAt least two seen in Makiivka in February 2015.[55][56]
TOS-1 Buratino 220mm multiple rocket launcher and thermobaric weapon 1+  Russia Observed in a training area in LPR-controlled Kruhlyk.[57]

Air Defences


Towed anti-aircraft gun

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
ZU-23-2[1]23mm anti-aircraft gun2+ Soviet UnionSome are mounted on trucks. Two seen in a Sverdlovsk convoy attached to MT-LBs.[14]

Air defense vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
9K33 Osa[1]6x6 amphibious surface-to-air missile system1 Soviet UnionOne claimed to be captured from Ukrainian forces in the "southern cauldron".[1][49][unreliable source?]
9K35 Strela-10[1][48]Short range surface-to-air missile3+ Soviet UnionOne from the Vostok Battalion was seen near the Donetsk Airport in July 2014 nicknamed "Лягушонок" (frogling).[1][58][unreliable source?] One seen in a Sverdlovsk convoy.[14] Another one spotted by OSCE SMM in 2021 nearl Luhansk.[59]
Pantsir-S1Medium range surface-to-air missile1+ RussiaIt is not known to have been exported to Ukraine.
Seen in Luhansk and Makiivka in early 2015.[32][60][61][62][unreliable source?] Its used rocket components were also reported to be observed in Ukraine in November 2014.[1]

Man-portable air-defense systems

Name Type Max. altitude Origin Photo Notes
9K32 Strela-2[1]Man-portable air-defense system1500m Soviet UnionSome Ukrainian stocks of Strela-2s went missing early in the conflict, and are presumably under NAF control.[1]
PPZR Grom[1]Man-portable air-defense system3500m PolandThis Polish weapon was reportedly captured from pro-Russian separatists. It was fitted with a Russian-made 9P516 gripstock, designed for the 9K38 Igla. Russian forces are known to have captured some of these from Georgia.[1]
9K38 Igla[1]Man-portable air-defense system3500m Soviet UnionSupplied by Russia (Ukrainian claim).[1][63][64] Captured from Ukrainian armouries (DPR claim).[65] The system has identification friend or foe system which undermines DPR claims.[66][unreliable source?]

Electronic warfare


Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
R-330Zh ZhitelAnti-cellular and satellite communications jamming station1+ RussiaOne station spotted by a UAV of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission near Michurine in August 2015 and 11 km south of Donetsk city in June 2016.[67][68]
RB-341V Leer-3 Anti-GSM reconnaissance and jamming station, with Orlan-10 drones 1+  Russia Spotted by the OSCE SMM near Chornukhyne, 64 km SW of Luhansk on 28 July 2018.[69] Observed by OSCE in 2020.[70]
R-934B Sinitsa Jamming station 1+  Russia Observed by OSCE in 2020.[70]
RB-636 Svet-KU Radio control and information protection system 1+  Russia Observed by OSCE in 2020.[70]
1L269 Krasukha-2 Anti-air jamming station 1+  Russia Spotted by the OSCE SMM near Chornukhyne, 64 km SW of Luhansk on 28 July 2018.[69]
RB-109A Bylina Brigade-level electronic warfare automated control system 1+  Russia Spotted by the OSCE SMM near Chornukhyne, 64 km SW of Luhansk on 28 July 2018.[69]
Repellent-1 Anti-drone electronic warfare system 1+  Russia Spotted by the OSCE SMM near Chornukhyne, 64 km SW of Luhansk on 28 July 2018.[69]
51U6 Kasta-2E1 C-band ultra-high frequency (300 MHz-1 GHz) 2D target acquisition radar designed to acquire the range and heading of small targets flying at low altitudes. Installed on KamAZ-43114 6×6 off-road chassis. 1  Russia Observed at a training area near Buhaivka, 37 km southwest of Luhansk by OSCE SMM drone.[71]

Aircraft


Combat jets

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
Aero L-29 Delfín[72]Military trainer aircraft/Light attack aircraft1 CzechoslovakiaAt least one plane retrofited from Lugansk museum.[73][74] On 19 January 2015, a LPR militia video showed a Georgian volunteer test driving a supposed operational L-29 (armed with two bombs) on a runway.[75] In 2018, it was displayed in Donetsk on Victory Day.
Sukhoi Su-25Military strike aircraft1 Soviet UnionOn 7 July 2014, LPR Defence Minister Igor Plotnitsky announced to ITAR-TASS that a Ukrainian Su-25 made an emergency landing after being shot at, and was captured by the LPR forces.[76] The Ukrainian military denied the incident.[77] On 2 February 2015, the restored LPR Su-25 allegedly conducted a sortie on a Ukrainian Army convoy near Debaltseve.[78]

Unmanned aerial vehicles

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
Orlan-10[1]Unmanned aerial vehicle6+ RussiaFour shot down by Ukrainian forces in 2014[1][79][unreliable source?] and one in 2016.
Another one crashed on Ukrainian territory in 2017.[80][unreliable source?]
ForpostUnmanned aerial vehicleN/A Israel
 Russia
Five UAVs shot down by Ukrainian forces.[81][82][83]
Consumer-grade UAVQuadcopterN/AOne used by the rebels during the Second Battle of Donetsk Airport.[1]

Ships


Motorboats

Name Type Quantity Origin Photo Notes
Motorboat25[84]Used by 9th Regiment of the Marine Corps in Sea of Azov.[84]

References


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