Lower Egypt

Lower Egypt (Arabic: مصر السفلى Miṣr as-Suflā; Coptic: ⲧⲥⲁϧⲏⲧ Tsakhet) is the northernmost region of Egypt, which consists of the fertile Nile Delta between Upper Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea, from El Aiyat, south of modern-day Cairo, and Dahshur. Historically, the Nile River split into seven branches of the delta in Lower Egypt. Lower Egypt was divided into nomes and began to advance as a civilization after 3600 BC.[1] Today, it contains two major channels that flow through the delta of the Nile River – Mahmoudiyah Canal (ancient Agathos Daimon) and Muways Canal (Arabic: بحر موَيس, "waterway of Moses").

Lower Egypt
ⲧⲥⲁϧⲏⲧ, ⲡⲥⲁⲙⲉⲛϩⲓⲧ
مصر السفلى
c. 3500 BC–c. 3100 BC
CapitalMemphis
Common languagesAncient Egyptian
Religion
Ancient Egyptian religion
GovernmentMonarchy
King 
 Unknown
Unknown (first)
 c. 3150 BC
Unknown (last)
History 
 Established
c. 3500 BC
 Disestablished
c. 3100 BC
Succeeded by
Early Dynastic Period (Egypt)
Today part ofEgypt
Map of Lower Egypt showing important sites that were occupied during the Protodynastic Period of Egypt (clickable map)
Deshret, the Red Crown of Lower Egypt
Map of Lower Egypt with its historical nomes