Machining

Machining is a process in which a material (often metal) is cut to a desired final shape and size by a controlled material-removal process. The processes that have this common theme are collectively called subtractive manufacturing,[1] in contrast to additive manufacturing, which uses controlled addition of material. Subtractive manufacturing utilizes machine tools, while additive manufacturing utilizes 3D printing.

New Guinea in 1943. Mobile machine shop truck of the US Army with machinists working on automotive parts

Machining is a part of the manufacture of many metal products, but it can also be used on other materials such as wood, plastic, ceramic, and composite material.[2] A person who specializes in machining is called a machinist. A room, building, or company where machining is done is called a machine shop. Much of modern-day machining is carried out by computer numerical control (CNC), in which computers are used to control the movement and operation of the mills, lathes, and other cutting machines. This increases efficiency, as the CNC machine runs unmanned therefore reducing labour costs for machine shops.


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Machining, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.