Marimba

The marimba (/məˈrɪmbə/) is a percussion instrument consisting of a set of wooden bars struck with yarn or rubber mallets to produce musical tones. Resonators or pipes are suspended underneath the bars to amplify their sound. The bars of a chromatic marimba are arranged like the keys of a piano, with the groups of two and three accidentals raised vertically, overlapping the natural bars to aid the performer both visually and physically. This instrument is a type of idiophone, but with a more resonant and lower-pitched tessitura than the xylophone. A person who plays the marimba is called a marimbist or a marimba player.

Marimba
Classical marimba, model Antonko AMC-12
Percussion instrument
Classification Percussion
Hornbostel–Sachs classification111.212
(Concussive idiophone or set of percussion sticks whose sound is generated by way of being struck by a mallet)
DevelopedMexico in the late 19th century (modern marimba)
Playing range
Related instruments
marimbaphone, xylophone
Musicians
See list of marimbists
Builders
See list of marimba manufacturers

Modern uses of the marimba include solo performances, woodwind and brass ensembles, marimba concertos, jazz ensembles, marching band (front ensembles), drum and bugle corps, indoor percussion ensembles, and orchestral compositions.