Mohawk people

The Mohawk people (Mohawk: Kanienʼkehá꞉ka[1]) are the most easterly section of the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois Confederacy. They are an Iroquoian-speaking indigenous people of North America, with communities in southeastern Canada and northern New York State, primarily around Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. As one of the five original members of the Iroquois League, the Kanienʼkehá꞉ka are known as the Keepers of the Eastern Door – the traditional guardians of the Iroquois Confederation against invasions from the east.

Map of Mohawk River
Mohawk
Kanienʼkehá꞉ka
Thayendanegea or Joseph Brant, painted by Gilbert Stuart, 1786
Regions with significant populations
 Canada (Quebec, Ontario)23,682
 United States (New York)5,632
Languages
English, Mohawk, French,
Formerly: Dutch, Mohawk Dutch
Religion
Karihwiio, Kanohʼhonʼio, Kahniʼkwiʼio, Christianity, Longhouse, Handsome Lake, Other Indigenous Religion
Related ethnic groups
Seneca Nation, Oneida Nation, Cayuga Nation, Onondaga Nation, Tuscarora Nation, other Iroquoian peoples

Historically, the Kanienʼkehá꞉ka people were originally based in the valley of the Mohawk River in present-day upstate New York, west of the Hudson River. Their territory ranged north to the St. Lawrence River, southern Quebec and eastern Ontario; south to greater New Jersey and into Pennsylvania; eastward to the Green Mountains of Vermont; and westward to the border with the Iroquoian Oneida Nation's traditional homeland territory.