Neuchâtel Xamax FCS


Neuchâtel Xamax FCS (pronounced [nøʃɑtɛl ksamaks]) is a Swiss football club based in Neuchâtel. It was created in 1970 through a merger between FC Cantonal, founded in 1906 and Swiss champions of 1916, and FC Xamax founded in 1912. The name Xamax comes from legendary Swiss international 'Xam' Max Abegglen, one of the founding members.[1] Xamax Neuchâtel FCS obtained its current name after a merger with FC Serrières, another side from Neuchâtel, in May 2013.[2]

Neuchâtel Xamax
Full nameNeuchâtel Xamax FCS
Nickname(s)Xamax
Founded1912
GroundStade de la Maladière,
Neuchâtel
Capacity12,000
ChairmanChristian Binggeli
ManagerMartin Rueda
LeagueSwiss Challenge League
2020–21Swiss Challenge League, 9th
WebsiteClub website
Chart of the table positions of Neuchâtel Xamax FCS and its previous incarnations in the Swiss football league system
Stade de la Maladière
Gilbert Gress, championship winning coach of the 1980s

History


Students at the Collège latin in Neuchâtel began playing organized football in 1910 soon after, in 1912, Neuchâtel Xamax was officially founded.[3]

They have been champions of Switzerland on two occasions, in successive years in 1987 and 1988.[4] The club has also made it to 5 Swiss Cup finals, the most recent in 2011, but have failed to win any of them.[4]

After many financial crises, the club declared bankruptcy on 26 January 2012 and was consequently excluded from Swiss Super League.[5] The club was reformed, but had to restart in the Swiss amateur leagues, entering the 2. Liga Interregional, the fifth tier of the Swiss football league system, for the 2012–13 season.[6] The club finished first in 2013 and was promoted to the 1. Liga Classic for 2013–14. Once again, Xamax finished first, winning the play-off to secure a second successive promotion. Xamax won 1. Liga Promotion, the third tier of Swiss league system and promoted to Challenge League after making third successive promotion in 2014–15 season.[4]

The club finally won promotion back to the Swiss Super League in 2018 after bankruptcy and six years in the lower leagues.[7]

Stadium


The club plays its home matches at the Stade de la Maladière, which began construction in 2004 and was opened in 2007. It has a capacity of 12,500 spectators.[8]

Current squad


As of 16 February 2021[9]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   SUI Anthony Mossi
4 DF   SUI Yves Kaiser
6 MF   SUI Fabio Saiz
7 MF   SUI Alan Rodriguez
8 MF   SUI Alexandre Pasche
9 FW   SUI Dylan Dugourd
10 MF  CMR Freddy Mveng
11 MF   SUI Pedro Teixeira
13 MF   SUI Migjen Basha
14 FW   SUI Raphaël Nuzzolo
15 DF   SUI Yoan Epitaux
16 MF   SUI Nicky Beloko (on loan from Fiorentina)
17 DF  SLE Umaru Bangura
18 FW  CTA Louis Mafouta
19 FW  LIE Noah Frick
No. Pos. Nation Player
20 MF  KVX Endrit Morina
21 MF   SUI Maxime Dominguez
22 FW   SUI Franck Surdez
23 DF   SUI Mike Gomes
24 DF  PHI Michael Kempter
25 FW  BFA Anthony Koura
26 GK   SUI Benjamin Roth
27 DF   SUI Bruno Morgado
28 DF   SUI Adam Ouattara
29 MF  ESP Juan Manuel Parapar
30 GK   SUI Laurent Walthert
55 DF   SUI Igor Đurić
77 MF   SUI Thibault Corbaz
94 FW  FRA Jason Mbock

Notable players


Africa
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Ivory Coast
Nigeria
Senegal
Asia
Philippines
Saudi Arabia
Europe
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Germany (West-Germany)
Ireland
Liechtenstein
Spain
Switzerland

Honours


Leagues
Cups

Former coaches


European record


Season Competition Round Opponents Home Away Aggregate
1981–82 UEFA Cup 1R Sparta Prague 4–0 2–3 6–3
2R Malmö 1–0 1–0 2–0
3R Sporting CP 1–0 0–0 1–0
QF Hamburg 0–0 2–3 2–3
1984–85 UEFA Cup 1R Olympiacos 2–2 0–1 2–3
1985–86 UEFA Cup 1R Sportul Studențesc 3–0 4–4 7–4
2R Lokomotiv Sofia 0–0 1–1 1–1 (a)
3R Dundee United 3–1 1–2 4–3
QF Real Madrid 2–0 0–3 2–3
1986–87 UEFA Cup 1R Lyngby 2–0 3–1 5–1
2R Groningen 1–1 0–0 1–1 (a)
1987–88 European Cup 1R Kuusysi 5–0 1–2 6–2
2R Bayern Munich 2–1 0–2 2–3
1988–89 European Cup 1R Larissa 2–1 1–2 3–3 (3–0 PSO)
2R Galatasaray 3–0 0–5 3–5
1990–91 European Cup Winners' Cup 1R Estrela de Amadora 1–1 1–1 2–2 (3–4 PSO)
1991–92 UEFA Cup 1R Floriana 2–0 0–0 2–0
2R Celtic 5–1 0–1 5–2
3R Real Madrid 1–0 0–4 1–4
1992–93 UEFA Cup 1R BK Frem 2–2 1–4 3–6
1995–96 UEFA Cup QR Red Star Belgrade 0–0 1–0 1–0
1R Roma 1–1 0–4 1–4
1996–97 UEFA Cup QR Anorthosis Famagusta 4–0 2–1 6–1
1R Dynamo Kyiv 2–1 0–0 2–1
2R Helsingborg 1–1 0–2 1–3
1997–98 UEFA Cup Q1 Tiligul-Tiras Tiraspol 7–0 3–1 10–1
Q2 Viking 3–0 1–2 4–2
1R Inter Milan 0–2 0–2 0–4
2003–04 UEFA Cup QR Valletta 2–0 2–0 4–0
1R Auxerre 0–1 0–1 0–2

References


  1. "Historique : La Genèse | NEUCHÂTEL XAMAX" (in French). Xamax.ch. Retrieved 27 January 2012.
  2. "Le Neuchâtel Xamax FCS est né" (in French). RTS Sport. 29 April 2013. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  3. "La Genèse" (in French). Neuchâtel Xamax. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  4. "Un palmarès plus que respectable" (in French). Neuchâtel Xamax. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  5. "Swiss club Xamax bankrupt, Chechen owner arrested - - SI.com". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Retrieved 27 January 2012.
  6. Meisterschaft 2. Liga interregional accessed: 21 July 2012
  7. "Switzerland side Neuchatel Xamax return to top division six years after bankruptcy, collapse". ESPN. 22 April 2018. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  8. "LA MALADIÈRE – HISTORIQUE" (in French). Neuchâtel Xamax. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  9. 1ère Equipe – Neuchâtel Xamax 1912