Nitrocellulose

Nitrocellulose[1]
Names
Other names
Cellulose nitrate; Flash paper; Flash cotton; Flash string; Gun cotton; Collodion; Pyroxylin
Identifiers
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
Properties
(C
6
H
9
(NO
2
)O
5
)
n
(mononitrocellulose)

(C
6
H
8
(NO
2
)
2
O
5
)
n
(dinitrocellulose)
(C
6
H
7
(NO
2
)
3
O
5
)
n
(trinitrocellulose, pictured in structures above)

Appearance Yellowish white cotton-like filaments
Melting point 160 to 170 °C (320 to 338 °F; 433 to 443 K) (ignites)
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
2
3
3
Flash point 4.4 °C (39.9 °F; 277.5 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
10 mg/kg (mouse, IV)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YN ?)

Nitrocellulose (also known as cellulose nitrate, flash paper, flash cotton, guncotton, pyroxylin and flash string, depending on form) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose through exposure to a mixture of nitric acid and sulfuric acid. One of its first major uses was as guncotton, a replacement for gunpowder as propellant in firearms. It was also used to replace gunpowder as a low-order explosive in mining and other applications. It is also a critical component in an early photographic emulsion called collodion, the use of which revolutionized photography in the 1860s.


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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Nitrocellulose, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.