North Asia

North Asia or Northern Asia, also referred to as Siberia, is the northern region of Asia, which is defined in geographical terms and is coextensive with the Asian part of Russia, and consists of three Russian regions east of the Ural Mountains: Ural, Siberia and the Russian Far East. North Asia is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to its north; by Eastern Europe to its west; by Central and East Asia to its south; and by the Pacific Ocean and North America to its east. It covers an area of 13,100,000 square kilometres (5,100,000 sq mi), or 8.8% of Earth's total land area; and is the largest subregion of Asia by area, but is also the least populated, with a population of around 33 million, accounting for merely 0.74% of Asia's population.

North Asia
Area13,100,000 km2 (5,100,000 sq mi)
Population33,765,005 (2017)
Population density2.6 per km2
GDP (nominal)$500 billion (2018)[1]
GDP per capita$15,000 (2018)
Ethnic groupsMajority Russian/Slavic
ReligionsMajority Orthodox Christian
DemonymSiberian
Countries Russia
Languages
Official languages
Time zones
Internet TLD.ru
.mn
Calling codeZone 7
Largest cities
UN M49 code151Eastern Europe
150Europe
001World
North Asia
Russian name
RussianСеверная Азия
RomanizationSevernaya Aziya

Topographically, the region is dominated by the Eurasian Plate, except for its eastern part, which lies on the North American, Amurian and Okhotsk Plates. It is divided by three major plains: the West Siberian Plain, Central Siberian Plateau and Verhoyansk-Chukotka collision zone. The Uralian orogeny in the west raised Ural Mountains, the informal boundary between Europe and Asia. Tectonic and volcanic activities are frequently occurred in the eastern part of the region as part of the Ring of Fire, evidenced by the formation of island arcs such as the Kuril Islands and ultra-prominent peaks such as Klyuchevskaya Sopka, Kronotsky and Koryaksky. The central part of North Asia is a large igneous province called the Siberian Traps, formed by a massive eruption occurred 250 million years ago. The formation of the traps coincided with the Permian–Triassic extinction event.

North Asia, geographically, is a subregion of Asia; however, because it was colonised and incorporated into Russia, it is culturally and politically a part of Europe. European cultural influences, specifically Russian, are predominant in the entire region, due to it experiencing Russian emigration from Europe starting from the 18th century.[2] Slavs and other Indo-Europeans consist of the vast majority of North Asia's population, and over 95% of the region's population is of European descent.[3][4]