North Wales

North Wales (Welsh: Gogledd Cymru), also known as the North of Wales (or simply the North, or in Welsh 'y Gogledd' in Wales), is a geographic region of Wales, encompassing its northernmost areas. It borders Mid Wales (or South Wales under some definitions) to the south, England to the east, and the Irish Sea to the north and west. The area is highly mountainous and rural, with Snowdonia National Park (Parc Cenedlaethol Eryri) and the Clwydian Range, known for its mountains, waterfalls and trails, located wholly within the region. Its population is more concentrated in the north-east, and northern coastal areas of the region, whilst significant Welsh-speaking populations are situated in its western and rural areas. North Wales is imprecisely defined, lacking any defined defintion or administrative structure. For the public purposes of health, policing and emergency services, and for statistical,[1] economic[2][3] and cultural[note 2][4] purposes, North Wales is commonly defined administratively as its six most northern principal areas, but other defintions of the geographic region exist, with Montgomeryshire historically considered to be part of the region.

North Wales
Gogledd Cymru
North of Wales, Northern Wales, Y Gogledd
Map of the most common definition of North Wales, following principal area boundaries. For historical reasons, Montgomeryshire is sometimes considered North Wales. Other cultural definitions of North Wales vary.
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country Wales
Historic counties
Principal areas
Preserved counties
List
Localities
List of Localities (some as a combined urban area)
Area
  Land6,172 km2 (2,383 sq mi)
Population
  Estimate (2018) [note 1]698,400
  Density113.6/km2 (294/sq mi)
Demonym(s)North Welsh, North Walian, "gogs" (informally)
Time zoneUTC±0 (GMT)
  Summer (DST)UTC+1 (BST)
Postcode
LL, CH, SY

Historically, for most of North Wales, the region can be referred to as simply "Gwynedd",[note 3][5] named after one of the last independent Welsh kingdoms, the Kingdom of Gwynedd. This has led to a stronger sense of Welsh identity and home to more Welsh-language speakers, especially in North West Wales, than the rest of Wales. Those from North Wales are sometimes referred to as "Gogs" (from "Gogledd" – the Welsh word for "north");[6] in comparison, those from South Wales are sometimes called "Hwntws" by those from North Wales. The term "North Wales" is rarely applied to all of Wales during the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain and the period of the Heptarchy, to distinguish it from "West Wales", known today as Cornwall,[7] although the term "Wales" or the names of the various petty kingdoms of Wales (Gwynedd, and Powys in North Wales) are more commonly used to depict the region during this time.

The region includes the localities of Wrexham, Deeside, Rhyl, Colwyn Bay, Flint, Bangor, Llandudno, and Holyhead. The largest localities in North Wales are the town of Wrexham and the conurbations of Deeside and Rhyl/Prestatyn, where the main retail, cultural, educational, tourism, and transport infrastructure and services of North Wales are located.