Nottingham (UK Parliament constituency)


Nottingham was a parliamentary borough in Nottinghamshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1295. In 1885 the constituency was abolished and the city of Nottingham divided into three single-member constituencies.

Nottingham
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Riotous hustings in the Great Marketplace on 26 June 1865[1]
1295–1885
Number of memberstwo
Replaced byNottingham East, Nottingham South and Nottingham West

History


Nottingham sent two representatives to Parliament from 1283 onwards.

The constituency was abolished in 1885 and replaced by Nottingham East, Nottingham South and Nottingham West.

Members of Parliament


1295–1640

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1318Robert Ingram[2]Simon Folville[2]
1322 (May)Geoffrey le Flemyng[2]Simon Folville[2]
1327 (Jan)Robert Ingram of Nottingham[2]Simon Folville[2]
1384 (Apr)John Tansley [3]
1385John Crowshaw [4]
1386William ButlerRobert Howden[5]
1388 (Feb)John CrowshawJohn Plumtre[5]
1388 (Sep)William ButlerThomas Mapperley[5]
1390 (Jan)William ButlerRobert German[5]
1390 (Nov)
1391William ButlerThomas Mapperley[5]
1393William ButlerNicholas Alestre[5]
1394
1395Thomas MapperleyRobert German[5]
1397 (Jan)Thomas MapperleyRobert German[5]
1397 (Sep)William GresleyJohn Hodings[5]
1399John PlumtreJohn Tansley[5]
1401
1402
1404 (Jan)
1404 (Oct)
1406Walter StacyThomas Fox[5]
1407John BothallJohn Jorce[5]
1410
1411Thomas MapperleyJohn Hodings[5]
1413 (Feb)Thomas MapperleyJohn Hodings 1[5]
1413 (May)Thomas MapperleyJohn Tansley[5]
1414 (Apr)John TansleyRobert Glade[5]
1414 (Nov)Walter StacyHenry Preston[5]
1415
1416 (Mar)John AlestreJohn Bingham[5]
1416 (Oct)
1417Henry PrestonWilliam Burton[5]
1419Robert GladeRichard Samon[5]
1420John BinghamThomas Poge[5]
1421 (May)Robert GladeJohn Alestre[5]
1421 (Dec)Richard SamonThomas Poge[5]
1422John Alestre [6]Thomas Poge [7]
1423Thomas Poge [7]
1425John Alestre [6]
1427Thomas Poge [7]
1510–1523No names known[8]
1529Anthony BabingtonHenry Statham, died and
replaced Jan 1535 by
Nicholas Quarnby[8]
1536?Sir Anthony Babington?[8]
1539Sir John MarkhamGeorge Pierrepont[8]
1542Edward Chamberlain?Sir John Markham[8]
1545Sir John MarkhamNicholas Powtrell[8]
1547John PastonNicholas Powtrell[8]
1553 (Mar)Robert HaselriggFrancis Colman[8]
1553 (Oct)Humphrey QuarnbyThomas Markham[8]
1554 (Apr)Humphrey QuarnbyFrancis Colman[8]
1554 (Nov)Nicholas PowtrellWilliam Markham[8]
1555Hugh ThornhillJohn Bateman[8]
1558Francis ColmanEdward Boun[8]
1558 (Dec)Thomas MarkhamJohn Bateman[8]
1562/1563Humphrey Quarnby, died and
replaced 1566 by
Ralph Barton
John Bateman[8]
1571Ralph BartonWilliam Ball[8]
1572 (Apr)Sir Thomas MannersJohn Bateman[8]
1584 (Oct)Richard ParkinsJohn Bateman[8]
1586Sir Robert ConstableRichard Parkins[8]
1588/1589Richard ParkinsGeorge Manners[8]
1593Richard ParkinsHumphrey Bonner[8]
1597 (Sep)Humphrey BonnerAnchor Jackson[8]
1601William GregoryWilliam Greaves[8]
1604–1611Richard Harte (or Hunt)Anchor Jackson
1614William GregoryRobert Staples
1621Michael PurefoyGeorge Lascelles
1623John ByronSir Charles Cavendish
1625Robert GreavesJohn Martyn
1626Sir Gervase CliftonJohn Byron
1628Sir Charles CavendishViscount Newark
1629–1640No Parliaments convened

1640–1885

YearFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
April 1640 Charles CavendishRoyalist Gilbert Boone
November 1640 William StanhopeRoyalist Gilbert MillingtonParliamentarian
January 1644 Stanhope disabled to sit – seat vacant
1645 Francis Pierrepont
1653 Nottingham was unrepresented in the Barebones Parliament
1654 James Chadwick John Mason
1656 William Drury
January 1659 John Whalley John Parker
May 1659 Gilbert Millington One seat vacant
April 1660 Arthur Stanhope John Hutchinson (banned as Regicide)
June 1660 Robert Pierrepont
1679 Richard Slater
1685 John Beaumont Sir William Stanhope
1689 Francis Pierrepont Edward Bigland
1690 Charles Hutchinson Richard Slater
1695 William Pierrepont
1699 Robert Sacheverell
January 1701 George Gregory
June 1701 Robert Sacheverell
December 1701 Robert Sacheverell
1702 George Gregory
1705 Robert Sacheverell
1706 John Plumptre Whig[9]
1708 Roby Sherwin
1710 Robert Sacheverell
1713 Borlase Warren Tory[9]
1715 John Plumptre Whig[9] George Gregory Whig[9]
1727 John Stanhope Borlase Warren Tory[9]
1734 John Plumptre Whig[9]
May 1747 Sir Charles Sedley
June 1747 George Howe Whig[9]
1754 Sir Willoughby Aston Tory[9]
1758 Colonel the Hon. (Sir) William Howe[n 1] Whig[9]
1761 John Plumptre
1774 Sir Charles Sedley Tory[9]
1778 Abel Smith
1779 Robert Smith Whig[9]
1780 Daniel Coke Tory[9]
1797 Captain Sir John Borlase Warren[n 2] Tory[9]
1802 Joseph Birch[n 3] Whig[9]
1803 Daniel Coke Tory[9]
1806 John Smith Whig[9]
1812 George Parkyns Whig[9]
1818 Joseph Birch Whig[9]
1820 Thomas Denman Whig[9]
1826 George Parkyns WHIG[9]
1830 Thomas Denman Whig[9] Sir Ronald Craufurd Ferguson Whig[9][10][11][12]
1832 John Ponsonby Whig[9]
1834 Sir John Hobhouse Radical[13][14][15][16][17]
April 1841 John Walter Conservative[9]
June 1841 George Larpent Whig[9][18][19][20]
1842 John Walter[n 4] Conservative[9]
1843 Thomas Gisborne Whig[21][22][23]
1847 John Walter (junior) Conservative Feargus O'Connor Chartist
1852 Peelite[24][25][26] Edward Strutt Whig[27][28][29][30]
1856 Charles Paget Radical[31]
1859 John Mellor Liberal Liberal
1861 Sir Robert Juckes Clifton Ind. Liberal[32]
1865[n 5] Samuel Morley Liberal
1866 Ralph Bernal Osborne Ind. Liberal[33] Viscount Amberley Liberal
1868 Sir Robert Juckes Clifton Ind. Liberal[34] Charles Ichabod Wright Conservative
1869 Charles Seely Liberal
1870 Hon. Auberon Herbert Liberal
1874 William Evelyn Denison Conservative Saul Isaac Conservative
April 1880 Charles Seely Liberal John Skirrow Wright Liberal
May 1880 Arnold Morley Liberal
1885 Constituency abolished

Notes

  1. Later General; knighted 1775
  2. Later Rear-Admiral
  3. On petition, Birch was found not to have been duly elected
  4. On petition, Walter's election was declared void and a by-election held, in which his son, John Walter (junior), took his place as Conservative candidate and was defeated
  5. On petition, the election of 1865 was declared void and a by-election held

Election results


Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Nottingham[9][35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Thomas Denman 1,206 46.2
Whig Ronald Craufurd Ferguson 1,180 45.2
Tory Thomas Bailey 226 8.7
Majority 954 36.5
Turnout 1,413 c.28.3
Registered electors c.5,000
Whig hold Swing
Whig hold Swing
General election 1831: Nottingham[9][35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Whig Thomas Denman Unopposed
Whig Ronald Craufurd Ferguson Unopposed
Registered electors c.5,000
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1832: Nottingham[9][36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Whig Ronald Craufurd Ferguson 2,399 41.9
Whig John Ponsonby 2,349 41.0
Tory James Edward Gordon 976 17.1
Majority 1,373 24.0
Turnout 3,322 63.6
Registered electors 5,220
Whig hold
Whig hold

Ponsonby was appointed Home Secretary and elevated to the House of Lords as Lord Duncannon, causing a by-election.

By-election, 25 July 1834: Nottingham[9][36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical John Hobhouse 1,591 73.8 N/A
Radical William Eagle 566 26.2 N/A
Majority 1,025 47.5 N/A
Turnout 2,157 41.8
Registered electors 5,166
Radical gain from Whig
General election 1835: Nottingham[9][36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Whig Ronald Craufurd Ferguson Unopposed
Radical John Hobhouse Unopposed
Registered electors 4,454
Whig hold
Radical gain from Whig

Hobhouse was appointed as President of the Board of Control for the Affairs of India, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 24 April 1835: Nottingham[9][36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Radical John Hobhouse Unopposed
Radical hold
General election 1837: Nottingham[9][36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Whig Ronald Craufurd Ferguson 2,056 29.8
Radical John Hobhouse 2,052 29.7
Conservative William Plowden[37] 1,397 20.2
Conservative Horace Twiss 1,396 20.2
Turnout 3,728 68.1
Registered electors 5,475
Majority 4 0.1
Whig hold
Majority 655 9.5
Radical hold

Elections in the 1840s

Ferguson's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 26 April 1841: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Walter Sr. 1,983 53.2 +12.8
Whig George Larpent 1,745 46.8 +17.0
Majority 238 6.4 N/A
Turnout 3,728 79.7 +11.6
Registered electors 4,678
Conservative gain from Whig Swing 2.1
General election 1841: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig George Larpent 529 39.4 +9.6
Radical John Hobhouse 527 39.3 +9.6
Conservative John Walter Sr. 144 10.7 9.5
Conservative Thomas Broughton Charlton[38] 142 10.6 9.6
Turnout 671 (est) 14.3 (est) c.53.8
Registered electors 5,260
Majority 2 0.1 ±0.0
Whig hold Swing +9.6
Majority 383 28.5 +19.0
Radical hold Swing +9.6

Walter and Charlton retired half an hour after the poll opened.[9]

Larpent resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 4 August 1842: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Walter Sr. 1,885 51.1 +29.8
Radical Joseph Sturge[39] 1,801 48.9 +9.6
Majority 84 2.3 N/A
Turnout 3,686 67.8 +53.5
Registered electors 5,436
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +10.1

Walter's election was declared void, on petition, due to bribery by his agents, on 23 March 1843, causing a by-election.[40]

By-election, 5 April 1843: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Thomas Gisborne 1,839 51.6 +12.2
Conservative John Walter Jr. 1,728 48.4 +27.1
Majority 111 3.1 +3.0
Turnout 3,567 69.0 +54.7
Registered electors 5,172
Whig hold Swing 7.5

Hobhouse was appointed President of the Board of Control for the Affairs of India, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 8 July 1846: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical John Hobhouse Unopposed
Radical hold
General election 1847: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Walter Jr. 1,683 34.8 +13.5
Chartist Feargus O'Connor 1,257 26.0 N/A
Whig Thomas Gisborne 999 20.7 18.7
Radical John Hobhouse 893 18.5 20.8
Turnout 2,416 (est) 46.9 (est) +32.6
Registered electors 5,148
Majority 426 8.8 N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +16.1
Majority 258 5.3 N/A
Chartist gain from Radical Swing N/A

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Edward Strutt 1,960 45.2 +24.5
Peelite John Walter Jr. 1,863 43.0 +8.2
Chartist Charles Sturgeon[41] 512 11.8 14.2
Turnout 2,168 (est) 41.2 (est) 5.7
Registered electors 5,260
Majority 97 2.2 N/A
Whig gain from Chartist Swing +15.8
Majority 1,351 31.2 N/A
Peelite gain from Conservative Swing +7.7

Strutt was appointed Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 1 January 1853: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Edward Strutt Unopposed
Whig hold

Strutt was elevated to the peerage, becoming 1st Baron Belper, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 30 July 1856: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Charles Paget Unopposed
Radical gain from Whig
General election 1857: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Charles Paget 2,393 49.4 +4.2
Peelite John Walter Jr. 1,836 37.9 5.1
Chartist Ernest Charles Jones[42] 614 12.7 +0.9
Turnout 2,422 (est) 42.9 (est) +1.7
Registered electors 5,650
Majority 557 11.5 +9.3
Radical gain from Whig Swing +1.9
Majority 1,222 25.2 6.0
Peelite hold Swing 2.8
General election 1859: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Charles Paget 2,456 37.1 +12.4
Liberal John Mellor 2,181 32.9 +8.2
Conservative Thomas Bromley[43] 1,836 27.7 N/A
Chartist Ernest Charles Jones 151 2.3 10.4
Majority 345 5.2 6.3
Turnout 3,312 (est) 55.1 (est) +12.2
Registered electors 6,012
Liberal hold Swing +8.8
Liberal hold Swing +6.7

Elections in the 1860s

Mellor resigned after being appointed a Judge of the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of Justice, causing a by-election.

By-election, 26 December 1861: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Liberal Robert Juckes Clifton[32] 2,513 69.1 N/A
Liberal Henry Pelham-Clinton 1,122 30.9 29.1
Majority 1,391 38.3 N/A
Turnout 3,635 55.6 +0.5
Registered electors 6,533
Independent Liberal gain from Liberal Swing N/A
General election 1865: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Samuel Morley 2,393 25.7 7.2
Independent Liberal Robert Juckes Clifton[32] 2,352 25.3 N/A
Liberal Charles Paget 2,327 25.0 12.1
Conservative Alfred Marten[44] 2,242 24.1 3.6
Turnout 4,657 (est) 78.5 (est) +23.4
Registered electors 5,934
Majority 41 0.4 4.8
Liberal hold Swing 2.7
Majority 25 0.3 N/A
Independent Liberal gain from Liberal Swing N/A

The election, "won by violence" and bribery was declared void on petition, causing a by-election.[45][32]

By-election, 11 May 1866: Nottingham[36][33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Liberal Ralph Bernal Osborne 2,518 25.9 N/A
Liberal John Russell 2,494 25.6 0.1
Conservative George Jenkinson 2,411 24.8 +0.7
Liberal Handel Cossham 2,307 23.7 1.3
Independent Liberal David Faulkner[46] 3 0.0 N/A
Turnout 4,867 (est) 82.0 (est) +3.5
Registered electors 5,934
Majority 24 0.2 +0.3
Independent Liberal hold Swing N/A
Majority 83 0.9 +0.5
Liberal hold Swing 0.2
General election 1868: Nottingham[36][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Liberal Robert Juckes Clifton 5,285 28.4 +3.1
Conservative Charles Ichabod Wright 4,591 24.6 +0.5
Liberal Charles Seely 4,004 21.5 4.2
Liberal Peter Clayden[47] 2,716 14.6 10.7
Independent Liberal Ralph Bernal Osborne 2,031 10.9 N/A
Turnout 11,609 (est) 81.9 (est) +3.4
Registered electors 14,168
Majority 694 3.7 +3.4
Independent Liberal hold Swing +5.3
Majority 587 3.2 N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.0
  • Wright was a Liberal-Conservative candidate.[34]

Clifton's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 16 June 1869: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Charles Seely 4,627 50.6 +14.5
Independent Liberal William Digby Seymour 4,517 49.4 N/A
Majority 110 1.2 N/A
Turnout 9,144 64.5 17.4
Registered electors 14,168
Liberal gain from Independent Liberal Swing N/A

Elections in the 1870s

Wright's resignation caused a by-election.

By-election, 24 Feb 1870: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Auberon Herbert 4,971 51.5 +15.4
Independent Liberal William Digby Seymour[48] 4,675 48.5 N/A
Majority 296 3.1 N/A
Turnout 9,646 68.1 13.8
Registered electors 14,168
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
General election 1874: Nottingham[36][49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Evelyn Denison 5,268 24.9 +12.6
Conservative Saul Isaac 4,790 22.6 +10.3
Liberal Robert Laycock[50] 3,732 17.6 3.9
Liberal Henry Labouchère 3,545 16.8 +2.2
Lib-Lab David Heath[51] 2,752 13.0 N/A
Independent Liberal Richard Birkin[52] 1,074 5.1 N/A
Majority 1,058 5.0 +1.8
Turnout 10,581 (est) 65.5 (est) 16.4
Registered electors 16,154
Conservative hold Swing +6.7
Conservative gain from Independent Liberal Swing +5.6

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Charles Seely 8,499 31.3 +13.7
Liberal John Skirrow Wright 8,055 29.6 +12.8
Conservative Saul Isaac 5,575 20.5 2.1
Conservative William Gill[53] 5,052 18.6 6.3
Majority 2,480 9.1 N/A
Turnout 13,591 (est) 72.7 (est) +7.2
Registered electors 18,699
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +7.9
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +9.6

Wright's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 8 May 1880: Nottingham[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Arnold Morley Unopposed
Liberal hold

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