Odysseus

Odysseus (/əˈdɪsiəs/;[1] Greek: Ὀδυσσεύς, Ὀδυσεύς, translit. Odysseús, Odyseús [o.dy(s).sěu̯s]), also known by the Latin variant Ulysses (US: /juːˈlɪsz/, UK: /ˈjuːlɪsz/; Latin: Ulysses, Ulixes), is a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same epic cycle.[2]

Odysseus
Head of Odysseus from a Roman period Hellenistic marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga, Italy
AbodeIthaca, Greece
Personal information
ParentsLaërtes
Anticlea
ConsortPenelope
ChildrenTelemachus
Telegonus
Roman equivalentUlysses

Son of Laërtes and Anticlea, husband of Penelope, and father of Telemachus and Acusilaus,[3] Odysseus is renowned for his intellectual brilliance, guile, and versatility (polytropos), and is thus known by the epithet Odysseus the Cunning (Greek: μῆτις, translit. mêtis, lit. "cunning intelligence"[4]). He is most famous for his nostos, or "homecoming", which took him ten eventful years after the decade-long Trojan War.