Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology (/ˌɒfθælˈmɒləi/)[1] is a branch of medicine and surgery that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the eye.[2] An ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in ophthalmology.[3] The credentials include a degree in medicine, followed by additional four to five years of residency training in ophthalmology. Residency training programs for ophthalmology may require a one-year internship with training in internal medicine, pediatrics, or general surgery. Additional specialty training (or fellowship) may be sought in a particular aspect of eye pathology.[4] Ophthalmologists are allowed to prescribe medications to treat eye diseases, implement laser therapy, and perform surgery when needed.[5] Ophthalmologists may participate in academic research on the diagnosis and treatment for eye disorders.[6]

Ophthalmology
Eye examination with the aid of a slit lamp
SystemEye
Significant diseasesBlurred vision, cataract, macular degeneration, glaucoma, refractive error, retinal disorders, diabetic retinopathy
Significant testsVisual field test, ophthalmoscopy
SpecialistOphthalmologist
GlossaryGlossary of medicine
Ophthalmologist
Occupation
NamesPhysician
Surgeon
Occupation type
Specialty
Activity sectors
Medicine, surgery
Description
Education required
Doctor of Medicine (M.D.),
Doctor of Osteopathic medicine (D.O.),
Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (M.B.B.S.),
Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB)
Fields of
employment
Hospitals, Clinics