Osnabrück Garrison


Osnabrück Garrison was a major British garrison with facilities located at Osnabrück in Lower Saxony and Münster in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It was home to 4th Armoured Brigade and most of its subordinate units. It formed a major part of British Forces Germany.

Location of Osnabrück in Lower Saxony

History


Scarborough Barracks (built in 1899 as Caprivi Kaserne after General Leo von Caprivi and now used as the University of Applied Sciences)
The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars, who were based at York Barracks, presenting their guidon party and honour guard during the Freedom of Münster parade, 1983
The NAAFI building at Osnabrück Garrison

The oldest part of Osnabrück Station was Caprivi Kaserne (named after General Leo von Caprivi), dating back to 1899; this became Scarborough Barracks after the Second World War and is now being used as the University of Applied Sciences.[1] Scharnhorst Kaserne (named after General Gerhard von Scharnhorst) was built in the 1930s; this went on after the War to be Belfast Barracks and is now being used as the Osnabrück Innovations Centre.[2] Meanwhile, Winkelhausen Kaserne (named after Colonel Willy Carl Winkelhausen) was also built in the 1930s; this went on after the War to become Roberts Barracks and is now being used as a freight hub.[2]

Am Limberg Kaserne (named after the height Limberg)[3] was built during the War in Osnabrück as an ammunition factory for the Wehrmacht;[4] this was expanded in the early 1950s to become Imphal Barracks (for cavalry and tank regiments) and Mercer Barracks (for infantry regiments) and is now being redeveloped for housing.[2] The site on Landwehrstraße which was occupied by the British Army as Quebec Barracks in the 1950s is now also being redeveloped for housing.[5]

Loddenheide Kaserne (Loddenheide being a part of the Gremmendorf district of Münster) was built in the 1930s; this expanded after the War and broken up into Buller Barracks, Swinton Barracks, Waterloo Barracks and York Barracks and its future use is now the subject of a local planning consultation.[6] Meanwhile, Hermann Göring Kaserne (named after Reich Marshal Hermann Göring) evolved to become Oxford Barracks after the War.[7]

The garrison became the largest British military base outside the UK.[8] It was the target of the Osnabrück mortar attack on 28 June 1996 when Quebec Barracks were hit by three Mark 15 mortar devices.[9] The barracks closed in 2009.[8][10]

Locations


Locations within the garrison area included:
Osnabrück Station:

Münster Station:

See also


References


  1. "Scarborough Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  2. "Osnabrück Konvision". Werstatt. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  3. "Limberg". Open Topographical Map. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  4. "70 ha barracks area in start position for new uses". Osnabrück. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  5. "Osnabrück: demolition of the barracks in Atter begins". Neuer Osnabrücker Zeitung. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  6. "Conversion". City of Münster. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  7. "Oxford Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  8. "British soldiers march out of Osnabrück after 63 years". 19 July 2008. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  9. Geraghty, Tony (2000). The Irish War. Johns Hopkins University Press, p. 193. ISBN 0-00-255617-0
  10. Heyman, Charles (19 January 2008). The British Army Guide 2008-2009. Pen and Sword. p. 38. ISBN 978-1-84415-2803.
  11. "Belfast Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  12. "Mercer / Imphal Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  13. "Quebec Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  14. "Roberts Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  15. "Buller Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  16. "Portsmouth Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  17. "Prestatyn Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  18. "Swinton Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  19. "Waterloo Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  20. "York Barracks". BAOR Locations. Retrieved 24 October 2015.