Pop-punk

Pop-punk (or punk-pop) is a rock music genre that combines elements of punk rock with power pop or pop. It is defined for its emphasis on classic pop songcraft, as well as adolescent and anti-suburbia themes, and is distinguished from other punk-variant genres by drawing more heavily from 1960s bands such as the Beatles, the Kinks, and the Beach Boys. The genre has evolved throughout its history, absorbing elements from new wave, college rock, ska, rap, emo, and boy bands. It is sometimes considered interchangeable with power pop and skate punk.

Pop-punk emerged in the late 1970s with groups such as the Ramones, the Undertones, and the Buzzcocks. 1980s punk bands like Bad Religion, Descendents and the Misfits were influential to pop punk, and pop punk expanded in the 1980s and early 1990s by a host of bands signed to Lookout! Records, including Screeching Weasel, the Queers, and the Mr. T Experience. In the mid–late 1990s, the genre saw a massive widespread popularity increase with bands like Green Day, the Offspring and Blink-182. The genre was further popularized by the Warped Tour. Pop-punk's success continued in the early 2000s with artists such as Avril Lavigne, Sum 41, Good Charlotte and New Found Glory.

In the mid–late 2000s, pop-punk acts were largely indistinguishable from artists tagged as "emo", to the extent that emo crossover acts such as Fall Out Boy and Paramore popularized a punk-pop style dubbed emo pop. By the 2010s, pop-punk's mainstream popularity had waned, with rock bands and guitar-centric music becoming rare on dance-focused pop radio. In the early 2020s, pop-punk began experiencing a resurgence with various new acts such as Machine Gun Kelly, KennyHoopla and Yungblud.


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Pop-punk, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.