Post-rock

Post-rock is a form of experimental rock[3] characterized by a focus on exploring textures and timbre over traditional rock song structures, chords, or riffs.[4] Post-rock artists are often instrumental,[5][6][3] typically combining rock instrumentation with electronics.[3] The genre emerged within the indie and underground music scene of the 1980s and early 1990s. However, due to its abandonment of rock conventions, it often bears little resemblance musically to contemporary indie rock,[6] borrowing instead from diverse sources including ambient, electronica, jazz, krautrock, dub, and minimalist classical.[3]

Artists such as Talk Talk and Slint have been credited with producing foundational works in the style in the early 1990s.[3][6] The term post-rock itself was notably employed by journalist Simon Reynolds in a review of the 1994 Bark Psychosis album Hex. It later solidified into a recognizable trend with the release of Tortoise's 1996 album Millions Now Living Will Never Die.[3] The term has since been used to describe bands which differ widely in style, making the term controversial among listeners and artists alike.[7]


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