Prime Minister of Denmark

The prime minister of Denmark (Danish: Danmarks statsminister, Faroese: Forsætisráðharri, Greenlandic: Naalagaaffiup Siulittaasuunera) is the head of government in the Kingdom of Denmark comprising the three constituent countries: Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Before the creation of the modern office, the kingdom did not initially have a head of government separate from its head of state, namely the monarch, in whom the executive authority was vested. The Constitution of 1849 established a constitutional monarchy by limiting the powers of the monarch and creating the office of premierminister. The inaugural holder of the office was Adam Wilhelm Moltke.

Prime Minister of Denmark
Danmarks statsminister
Incumbent
Mette Frederiksen

since 27 June 2019
StyleHer Excellency (diplomatic, outside Denmark[1])
Member ofCouncil of State
Cabinet
European Council
ResidenceMarienborg
SeatChristiansborg, Copenhagen, Denmark
AppointerThe Monarch
Based on Appointee's ability to gain majority support in the Folketing
Term lengthNo fixed term
Inaugural holderAdam Wilhelm Moltke
Formation22 March 1848
DeputyDeputy Prime Minister
Salary1,458,000 p.a. DKK (195,500)
WebsiteThe Prime Minister's Office

The prime minister presides over a cabinet that is formally appointed by the monarch. In practice, the appointment of the prime minister is determined by his or her support in the Folketing (the National Parliament). Since the beginning of the 20th century, no single party has held a majority in the Folketing so the prime minister must head a coalition of political parties, as well as his or her own party. Additionally, only four coalition governments since World War II have enjoyed a majority in the Folketing, so the coalitions (and the prime minister) must also gain loose support from other minor parties.

The current prime minister of Denmark is Mette Frederiksen, since 27 June 2019. Frederiksen's administration is a coalition between the Social Democrats with parliamentary support from the Social Liberals, Socialist People's Party, Red–Green Alliance, the Faroese Social Democratic Party and Greenland's Inuit Ataqatigiit and Siumut.