Proposed referendum on the Brexit withdrawal agreement


A referendum on the Brexit withdrawal agreement, also referred to as a "second referendum"[lower-alpha 1] or a "people's vote",[lower-alpha 2] has been proposed by a number of politicians and pressure groups as a way to break the deadlock in Parliament surrounding the meaningful vote on the Brexit deal.

Part of a series of articles on
Brexit
(withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union)
United Kingdom portal
European Union portal
Part of a series of articles on the
British membership
of the
European Union
United Kingdom portal
European Union portal

Following the invocation of Article 50 to begin Brexit negotiations, most proposals for a new referendum have suggested a choice between accepting the negotiated withdrawal agreement and remaining in the EU, sometimes with the additional option to leave the EU with no deal. In the case of a three-option referendum, voting systems such as supplementary vote,[2] and Borda count[3] have been suggested to allow people to state their second preferences.

Reasons which have been cited as justification include campaign finance violations by Vote Leave and Leave.EU, alleged use of data illicitly harvested by Cambridge Analytica,[4][5] revelations of Russian interference through fake social media accounts and allegedly through funding,[6] arguments that the "Leave" camp promoted misinformation,[7] a gradual shift in public opinion, fuelled in part by demographic changes such as young people gaining the right to vote,[8] and that the eventually arranged terms of Brexit were unknown at the time of the original vote.[9][10]

The most widely discussed proposal has been a referendum between "Remain" and "Accept the deal", promoted by the People's Vote pressure group.[failed verification] As of August 2019, this is the official position of the Liberal Democrats, the Green Party of England and Wales and Change UK. The Labour Party also adopted this position in September 2019,[11] while the Scottish National Party has voted in Parliament in favour of a second vote.[failed verification] The Conservative Party are opposed to any referendum.[12]

History

A few weeks after the referendum, an e-petition originally set up beforehand by a member of the Leave-supporting English Democrats[failed verification] demanding it be re-run in the event that a supermajority was not reached became the most popular petition on the site, receiving 4,150,262 signatures.[failed verification] As it reached the threshold,[clarification needed] the petition received a non-binding debate in Parliament but its proposal was rejected.[13][failed verification]

The Liberal Democrats and Green Party went into the 2017 United Kingdom general election campaigning in favour of a second referendum,[14][15] and a minority of pro-European rebels from Labour and the Conservatives also spoke in favour of it.[citation needed] These[clarification needed] allied in April 2018 into the People's Vote campaign group.[16] After several cabinet ministers resigned in protest at the Chequers statement setting out the Government's position in the Brexit negotiations, Conservative MP Justine Greening proposed a three-way referendum, using the supplementary vote system in an attempt to avoid vote splitting.[2]

The leader of the Trades Union Congress, which is closely allied with Labour, said at its 2018 conference that it would declare in favour of a second referendum if the government failed to get "the deal that working people need".[17] On 25 September 2018, delegates at the Labour party conference voted in favour of a motion that if Labour did not support Theresa May's deal, and if subsequent attempts to call another general election failed, the party should explore all options, including a second referendum.[18] Some observers[who?] saw those conditions as fulfilled by the defeat of the meaningful vote on the 15 January 2019 and the vote of no confidence in May held the following day.[citation needed] However, the Labour leadership did not make any commitments to a referendum at that time.[19] In early December 2018, the Financial Times reported that Leave groups had also started preparing for another referendum.[20]

On 18 February 2019, seven pro-European MPs resigned from the Labour Party to form The Independent Group (TIG). Over the following days, another Labour MP and three Conservative Party MPs joined them. All eleven[failed verification] support a referendum.[21]

The following week, the Labour Party announced that it would put forward its own second referendum amendment if its attempts to safeguard workers' rights, Single Market access and Customs Union membership fails.[22]

In September 2019, the Labour Party adopted the position of holding a public vote on whether to leave or remain regardless of which party negotiated the withdrawal agreement.[11]

Parliamentary votes

The proposal for a referendum on the withdrawal agreement was first put to Parliament on 14 March 2019 in an amendment (tabled by Sarah Wollaston) to the motion to request the first extension to the Article 50 deadline, where it was rejected by 85–334, with the Labour Party (and all but 43 of its MPs) abstaining.[23][24]

On 27 March and 1 April 2019, a series of indicative votes was held, both times including a referendum on the withdrawal agreement among the proposals. All proposals failed, with those for such a referendum receiving in the first round 268 Ayes, 295 Noes and 71 abstentions (a majority of 27) and in the second round 280 Ayes, 292 Noes and 62 abstentions (a majority of 12). In both rounds, it was the proposal second-closest to receiving an affirmative majority.

Opinion polling

With "Neither" responses
Normalised
Opinion polling (since the 2016 referendum) on whether the UK should leave or remain in the EU
  Leave
  Remain

Polling companies have asked questions based on a hypothetical future referendum since the 2016 referendum. For most of 2016 and 2017, public opinion was consistently against another referendum[25] and in the event one was called, polling suggested the Leave option would win again. As Brexit negotiations continued however, the Leave lead consistently slipped and public support for another referendum grew.[26] As of February 2019, no poll in the Britain Elects poll-tracker has shown a lead for Leave since April 2018, and political scientist John Curtice has noted "a modest but discernible softening of the Leave vote".[27][26]

The results of polls asking whether a further referendum should be held vary depending on how the question is phrased: in general a "second referendum" is less popular than a "public vote" or similar descriptor.[28]

After the scale of Conservative rebellion to the Chequers statement became clear, some polls asked a three-way preference between "Remain", "Deal" and "No deal". The results in this case depend to a great degree on the choice of voting system – a first-past-the-post system for example might see a large Remain win due to vote splitting between the two Leave options.[29]

Support for a future referendum

The following table shows the support for a public vote on the withdrawal agreement or a second EU referendum according to polls conducted since the 2016 referendum.

Date(s) conducted Support Oppose Neither Lead Sample Conducted by Polling type Notes
17–18 Oct 2019 47% 44% 9% 3% 1,025 Survation Online
43% 41% 16% 2% [note 1]
17 Oct 2019 EU and UK negotiators agree a new withdrawal agreement.[30]
2–14 Oct 2019 41% 45% 14% 4% 26,000 ComRes Three-option referendum
29–30 Sep 2019 47% 29% 24% 18% 1,620 YouGov Online As opposed to a parliamentary vote, if a deal is negotiated.
52% 23% 25% 29% As opposed to a parliamentary vote, if no deal is negotiated.
5–9 Sep 2019 53% 29% 18% 24% 1,144 Kantar Online
5–7 Sep 2019 43% 42% 15% 1% 2,049 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
3–4 Sep 2019 46% 41% 13% 5% 1,533 YouGov Online
29–31 Aug 2019 41% 47% 12% 6% 2,028 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
15–19 Aug 2019 52% 29% 19% 23% 1,133 Kantar Online
25–27 Jul 2019 44% 44% 12% 0% 2,001 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
24 Jul 2019 Boris Johnson replaces Theresa May as Prime Minister
2–5 Jul 2019 41% 39% 19% 2% 1,532 BMG Research Online [note 1]
23 May 2019 2019 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom
9–13 May 2019 47% 28% 25% 19% 1,152 Kantar Online
4–8 Apr 2019 51% 32% 17% 19% 1,172 Kantar Online
2–5 Apr 2019 52% 24% 24% 28% 1,500 BMG Research Online
3 Apr 2019 35% 39% 25% 4% 1,068 Sky Data Online [note 2]
1 Apr 2019 The House of Commons rejects a motion proposing a referendum on the withdrawal agreement in the second round of indicative votes.
28–30 Mar 2019 40% 38% 22% 2% 1,010 Deltapoll Online
29 Mar 2019 The House of Commons votes to reject the Government's proposed withdrawal agreement for the third time.
28–29 Mar 2019 42% 40% 19% 2% 2,008 Opinium Online On whether MPs should have voted for the relevant motion during the indicative votes
27 Mar 2019 The House of Commons rejects a motion proposing a referendum on the withdrawal agreement in the first round of indicative votes.
27 Mar 2019 40% 35% 25% 4% 1,005 Sky Data Online On whether MPs should vote for the relevant motion during the indicative votes
19 Mar 2019 48% 36% 15% 12% 2,084 YouGov Online
14–15 Mar 2019 48% 36% 15% 12% 1,823 YouGov Online
50% 36% 14% 14% YouGov On whether to leave with no deal or remain in the EU, if the UK looks set to leave without a deal
14–15 Mar 2019 38% 52% 10% 14% 1,756 YouGov Online [note 1]
14 Mar 2019 The House of Commons rejects an amendment which called for a referendum on the withdrawal agreement.
12 Mar 2019 The House of Commons votes to reject the Government's proposed withdrawal agreement for the second time.
4–5 Mar 2019 44% 56% 11% 2,042 ComRes Online No "Neither" option. Unusual wording. [note 1]
21–23 Feb 2019 43% 45% 11% 2% 1,027 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
18 Feb 2019 47% 35% 18% 12% 1,021 Survation Online
8–11 Feb 2019 41% 48% 11% 7% 2,004 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
4–8 Feb 2019 50% 32% 17% 18% 1,503 BMG Research Online
18 Jan 2019 39% 48% 14% 9% 1,021 Sky Data Online [note 1]
17 Jan 2019 30% 30% 40% 0% 1,792 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
35% 29% 36% 6% Sky Data [note 2]
33% 31% 35% 2% Sky Data [note 3]
37% 30% 33% 7% Sky Data [note 4]
16–17 Jan 2019 38% 47% 15% 9% 2,031 ComRes Online [note 1]
16 Jan 2019 47% 36% 16% 11% 1,070 YouGov Online
15 Jan 2019 The House of Commons votes to reject the Government's proposed withdrawal agreement for the first time.[31]
14–15 Jan 2019 35% 48% 17% 12% 2,010 ComRes Online [note 1]
8–11 Jan 2019 46% 28% 26% 18% 1,514 BMG Research Online
7–8 Jan 2019 36% 49% 15% 13% 1,754 YouGov Online [note 1]
21 Dec 2018 – 4 Jan 2019 41% 36% 22% 5% 25,537 YouGov Online
14–15 Dec 2018 44% 35% 21% 9% 1,660 YouGov Online Three-option referendum
14–15 Dec 2018 50% 27% 22% 23% 1,660 YouGov Online If Parliament cannot decide how to procede
13–14 Dec 2018 43% 46% 12% 3% 2,022 Deltapoll Online [note 1]
12–14 Dec 2018 44% 35% 20% 9% 5,043 YouGov Online
30 Nov-2 Dec 2018 40% 50% 11% 10% 2,035 ComRes Online [note 1]
9–30 Nov 2018 Ministers including Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab and Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey resign in protest to the government's proposed withdrawal agreement (or to plans preceding it).[32]
28–29 Nov 2018 45% 36% 18% 9% 1,655 YouGov Online
23–26 Nov 2018 53% 39% 8% 14% 1,119 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
15-16 Nov 2018 44% 30% 26% 14% 1,256 Populus Online
15 Nov 2018 55% 35% 10% 20% 1,488 Sky Data SMS Three-option referendum. Not weighted by 2016 vote.
15 Nov 2018 42% 38% 20% 4% 1,070 Survation Online
14–15 Nov 2018 48% 34% 17% 14% 1,153 YouGov Online
14–15 Nov 2018 47% 53% 6% 2,000 ComRes Online Only if there is no deal. Not weighted by 2016 vote. No "Neither" option. [note 1]
14 Nov 2018 The UK Cabinet approves a new draft withdrawal agreement.[33]
7 Nov 2018 The Scottish Parliament commits to providing unequivocal support for a public vote on the final terms of the Brexit deal.[34]
24 Oct – 6 Nov 2018 65% 35% 30% 8,154 Populus Online No "Neither" option
20 Oct – 2 Nov 2018 43% 37% 20% 6% 20,086 Survation Online [note 2]
38% 39% 23% 1% [note 3]
39% 37% 24% 2% [note 5]
28 Sep – 1 Oct 2018 53% 40% 7% 13% 1,443 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
25–26 Sep 2018 34% 50% 16% 16% 1,634 YouGov Online [note 3]
37% 48% 15% 11% [note 2]
21–22 Sep 2018 39% 43% 17% 4% 1,643 YouGov Online
18–19 Sep 2018 40% 43% 17% 3% 2,509 YouGov Online
10–11 Sep 2018 50% 39% 10% 11% 1,070 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
4–5 Sep 2018 40% 41% 18% 1% 1,628 YouGov Online
31 Jul – 4 Sep 2018 45% 35% 21% 10% 25,641 YouGov Online
31 Aug – 1 Sep 2018 40% 43% 17% 3% 1,600 YouGov Online
31 Aug – 1 Sep 2018 45% 37% 18% 9% 1,017 Survation Online
17–20 Aug 2018 50% 42% 9% 8% 1,330 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
31 Jul – 20 Aug 2018 45% 33% 22% 12% 18,772 YouGov Online
6–10 Aug 2018 48% 24% 27% 24% 1,481 BMG Research Online
26–31 Jul 2018 43% 41% 17% 2% 4,957 YouGov Online [note 2]
25–26 Jul 2018 42% 40% 18% 2% 1,631 YouGov Online
24 Jul 2018 The Independent launches its campaign for a second referendum.[35]
20–23 Jul 2018 50% 40% 10% 9% 1,466 Sky Data Online Three-option referendum
16–17 Jul 2018 40% 42% 18% 2% 1,657 YouGov Online
36% 47% 17% 11% Three-option referendum
10–11 Jul 2018 37% 41% 23% 4% 1,732 YouGov Online
8–9 Jul 2018 Brexit Secretary David Davis and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson resign.[36]
6 Jul 2018 The UK Cabinet agrees the Chequers statement, setting out a proposal on the future UK–EU relationship.[37]
3–5 Jul 2018 44% 27% 29% 17% 1,511 BMG Research Online
19–20 Jun 2018 37% 45% 18% 8% 1,663 YouGov Online
19–20 Jun 2018 48% 25% 27% 23% 1,022 Survation Online
13–14 May 2018 38% 46% 16% 8% 1,634 YouGov Online
12 May 2018 The National Union of Students calls for a referendum on the final deal.[38]
1–4 May 2018 53% 31% 16% 22% 2,005 Opinium
15 Apr 2018 People's Vote campaign launched.[39]
10–12 Apr 2018 52% 31% 17% 21% 2,008 Opinium Online
9–10 Apr 2018 38% 45% 17% 7% 1,639 YouGov Online
6–8 Apr 2018 47% 36% 17% 11% 2,012 ICM Online [note 2]
5–6 Apr 2018 39% 45% 17% 6% 823 YouGov Online [note 2]
26–27 Mar 2018 36% 42% 22% 6% 1,659 YouGov Online
16–23 Mar 2018 41% 52% 7% 11% 1,616 Sky Data Online [note 1]
5–6 Mar 2018 36% 43% 20% 7% 1,641 YouGov Online
2 Mar 2018 35% 54% 11% 19% 1,096 ComRes Online [note 1]
2 Mar 2018 Theresa May makes Mansion House speech, outlining the UK Government's policy on the future UK–EU relationship.[40]
16–23 Mar 2018 41% 52% 7% 12% 1,616 Sky Data Online [note 1]
14–16 Feb 2018 34% 54% 11% 20% 1,482 Sky Data Online [note 1]
16–19 Jan 2018 35% 56% 9% 21% 1,096 Sky Data Online [note 1]
10–19 Jan 2018 47% 34% 19% 13% 5,075 ICM Online [note 2]
9–10 Jan 2018 36% 43% 21% 7% 1,714 YouGov Online
15 Dec 2017 The European Council decides to proceed to the second phase of the Brexit negotiations.[41]
10–11 Dec 2017 33% 42% 24% 9% 1,680 YouGov Online
30 Nov – 1 Dec 2017 50% 34% 16% 16% 1,003 Survation Online
23–24 Oct 2017 32% 46% 22% 14% 1,637 YouGov Online
22–24 Sep 2017 34% 46% 21% 12% 1,716 YouGov Online
22 Sep 2017 Theresa May makes Florence speech, in an attempt to 'unblock' the Brexit negotiations.[42]
12–13 Sep 2017 34% 47% 19% 13% 1,660 YouGov Online
14–15 Jul 2017 46% 39% 15% 7% 1,024 Survation Online
7–11 Jul 2017 41% 48% 12% 7% 2,005 Opinium [note 2]
28–30 Jun 2017 46% 47% 6% 1% 1,017 Survation Telephone
16–20 Jun 2017 38% 51% 11% 13% 2,005 Opinium [note 2]
19 Jun 2017 Brexit negotiations begin.[43]
16–17 Jun 2017 48% 43% 9% 5% 1,005 Survation Telephone
16–17 Jun 2017 38% 57% 4% 19% 1,005 Survation Telephone [note 2]
10 Jun 2017 36% 55% 9% 18% 1,036 Survation Online [note 1]
8 Jun 2017 2017 United Kingdom general election
28 Apr – 2 May 2017 36% 53% 11% 17% 2,003 Opinium [note 2]
27–28 Apr 2017 31% 49% 20% 18% 1,612 YouGov Online
21–22 Apr 2017 39% 46% 14% 7% 2,072 Survation Online
20–21 Apr 2017 31% 48% 21% 17% 1,590 YouGov Online
29 Mar 2017 The United Kingdom invokes Article 50.[44]
17–21 Mar 2017 38% 52% 10% 14% 2,003 Opinium [note 2]
17 Jan 2017 Theresa May makes Lancaster House speech, setting out the UK Government's negotiating priorities.[45]
15–18 Dec 2016 35% 53% 13% 18% 2,048 ComRes [note 1]
13–16 Dec 2016 33% 52% 15% 19% 2,000 Opinium [note 2]
2 Oct 2016 Theresa May makes Conservative Party Conference speech, announcing her intention to invoke Article 50 by 31 March 2017.[46]
13 Jul 2016 Theresa May becomes Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.[47]
29–30 Jun 2016 32% 60% 7% 28% 1,017 BMG Research Online [note 1]
27–28 Jun 2016 31% 58% 11% 27% 1,760 YouGov Online [note 1]
23 Jun 2016 2016 United Kingdom European Union membership referendum
  1. Question asked about a second EU referendum, not necessarily on the final deal.
  2. Referendum on whether to accept the negotiated terms or remain in the EU.
  3. Referendum on whether to accept the negotiated terms or leave the EU without a deal.
  4. Referendum on whether to remain in the EU or leave the EU without a deal.
  5. Referendum on whether to accept the negotiated terms or re-open negotiations with a view to getting a better deal.

Advocates

Political parties

Members of Parliament

Labour Party
Labour Party MPs advocating a referendum on the proposed withdrawal agreement
Independent
Independent MPs advocating a referendum on the proposed withdrawal agreement

Notes

  1. After the 2016 United Kingdom European Union membership referendum. A few commentators, such as New Statesman political editor Stephen Bush, prefer third referendum, counting both the 2016 referendum and the 1975 United Kingdom European Communities membership referendum.[1]
  2. People's Vote is the name of a pressure group. For this reason, some broadcasters avoid the term or prefer "so-called people's vote"

References

  1. Bush, Stephen (26 February 2019). "What would happen if there was a second EU referendum?". New Statesman. Retrieved 12 January 2018.
  2. Sabbagh, Dan; Walker, Peter (16 July 2018). "Justine Greening endorses second Brexit referendum". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  3. Xefteris, Dimitrios; Troumpounis, Orestis. "Brexit deadlock: this three-way referendum design could break it". The Conversation. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  4. "Brexit result has been thrown into question by the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, says Tory MP". The Independent. 30 April 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  5. "Whistleblower: 'Cambridge Analytica scandal helped Brexit vote'". Evening Standard. 4 June 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  6. McGaughey, Ewan (16 August 2018). "Could Brexit Be Void?". doi:10.2139/ssrn.3232632. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  7. Fletcher, Martin (10 April 2019). "The "will of the people" is not set in stone – a second referendum is the only way to heal the nation". New Statesman. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  8. Ford, Robert (30 March 2019). "Brexit: how do voters feel about the EU now?". The Observer. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  9. "The need for a second referendum". www.ox.ac.uk. University of Oxford. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  10. McRae, Belinda; Lodder, Andrew. "There's a democratic case for a second referendum – this is how it can be done". New Statesman. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  11. "Brexit: Labour manifesto to offer vote on Leave and Remain". BBC News. 10 September 2019. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  12. "Where parliament's warring tribes stand on what next for Brexit". 17 January 2019. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  13. Slawson, Nicola (10 July 2016). "Brexit: no second EU referendum despite e-petition, says government". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  14. "'This is your chance,' Lib Dems tell voters opposed to Hard Brexit". The Herald. 18 April 2017. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  15. "Green Party leader Caroline Lucas calls for second EU referendum". The Independent. 2 September 2016. Retrieved 19 April 2017.
  16. Staff writer (15 April 2018). "Brexit: 'People's Vote' campaign group launched". BBC News. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  17. "Brexit: TUC issues new EU referendum warning to May". BBC News. 8 September 2018.
  18. Said-Moorhouse, Lauren; Bashir, Nada (26 September 2018). "The chances of a second Brexit referendum just got higher". CNN. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  19. Stewart, Heather; Elgot, Jessica (21 January 2019). "Corbyn holds back from conceding to calls for second EU referendum". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  20. Payne, Sebastian (7 December 2018). "Lynton Crosby aide working behind the scenes with Eurosceptics on strategy for new vote". Financial Times. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  21. Maguire, Patrick (18 February 2019). "Q&A: Who are the Independent Group and what do they stand for?". The New Statesman. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  22. Elgot, Jessica (25 February 2019). "Jeremy Corbyn: we'll back a second referendum to stop Tory no-deal Brexit". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  23. "MPs reject a second Brexit referendum by 334 votes to 85". BBC. 14 March 2019. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  24. "UK's withdrawal from the European Union: Sarah Wollaston's amendment (h)". CommonsVotes.DigiMinister.com. n.d. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  25. Matthew, Smith (27 July 2018). "For the first time, more people support a second referendum". YouGov. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  26. Curtice, John (8 February 2019). "Has There Been a Shift in Support for Brexit?". What UK Thinks. National Centre for Social Research. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  27. "Would Britain vote for Brexit again?". Britain Elects. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  28. "A Question of Wording? Another Look at Polling on a Second Referendum". What UK Thinks: EU. Retrieved 30 March 2019.
  29. Fisher, Steve. "Deal or No Deal or Remain". Deltapoll. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  30. "New Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration". GOV.UK. Department for Exiting the European Union. 19 October 2019. Retrieved 2 November 2019. The revised Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration were considered and agreed at European Council on 17 October 2019.
  31. "Brexit: Theresa May's deal is voted down in historic Commons defeat". BBC News. 15 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  32. "Tory minister Sam Gyimah resigns in protest at Theresa May's Brexit deal". The Telegraph. 1 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  33. "Brexit: Cabinet backs draft agreement". BBC News. 14 November 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  34. "Meeting of the Parliament 07 November 2018 [Draft]". The Scottish Parliament. 7 November 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018. providing unequivocal support for a public vote on the final terms of the Brexit deal.
  35. "The referendum gave sovereignty to the British people, so now they deserve a final say on the Brexit deal". The Independent. 24 July 2018. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  36. "Boris Johnson tells PM she is suffocating Brexit 'dream'". BBC News. 9 July 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  37. "Brexit: Cabinet agrees 'collective' stance on future EU deal". BBC News. 7 July 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018.
  38. Helm, Toby (12 May 2018). "One million students join calls for vote on Brexit deal". The Observer. Retrieved 10 Sep 2018.
  39. Quinn, Ben (16 April 2018). "Brexit: MPs from four parties jointly launch push for people's vote campaign". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  40. "'Hard facts' for both sides in Brexit talks - Theresa May". BBC News. 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  41. "Brexit: EU leaders agree to move talks to next stage". BBC News. 15 December 2017. Retrieved 16 December 2017.
  42. "Theresa May urges EU to retain trade terms for two years after Brexit". BBC News. 22 September 2017. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  43. "Brexit negotiations: Barnier rules out 'concessions'". BBC News. 19 June 2017. Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  44. "'No turning back' on Brexit as Article 50 triggered". BBC News. 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.
  45. "Brexit: UK to leave single market, says Theresa May". BBC News. 17 January 2017. Retrieved 24 March 2017.
  46. "Brexit: Theresa May to trigger Article 50 by end of March". BBC News. 2 October 2016. Retrieved 16 October 2016.
  47. "Theresa May vows to be 'one nation' prime minister". BBC News. 13 July 2016. Retrieved 24 March 2017.
  48. "Europe". Liberal Democrats. Liberal Democrats. n.d. Retrieved 31 July 2019. we will put the Brexit deal to a vote in a referendum
  49. "Europe". The Green Party. Green Party. Spring 2017. Retrieved 31 July 2019. we believe that democracy requires... the country be given a further say by way of a ratification referendum on the proposed deal
  50. "What is the SNP's plan for Brexit?". Scottish National Party. Scottish National Party. n.d. Retrieved 31 July 2019. We believe that MPs should come together to support a new referendum on EU membership.
  51. "Change UK Charter for Remain" (PDF). European Parliament. Change UK. n.d. Retrieved 31 July 2019. we want a People’s Vote
  52. "European Manifesto" (PDF). Party of Wales. Plaid Cymru. n.d. Retrieved 31 July 2019. we have campaigned from the outset for a Final Say referendum
  53. "Brexit". Alliance Party. Alliance Party of Northern Ireland. n.d. Retrieved 31 October 2019. The most coherent, feasible and democratic way forward on Brexit is a People’s Vote.
  54. "Fighting Brexit and a People's Vote" (PDF). SDLP. SDLP. n.d. Retrieved 31 October 2019. we are also supportive of the people’s vote campaign
  55. Corbyn, Jeremy (9 July 2019). "The next Prime Minister should put their Brexit deal or No Deal back to the people". The Labour Party. Labour Party. Retrieved 16 September 2019. Whoever becomes the new Prime Minister should have the confidence to put their deal, or No Deal, back to the people in a public vote.
  56. "Labour leadership divisions open as Corbyn and Watson disagree on election". ITV News. 11 September 2019. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  57. Wheeler, Brian (11 September 2018). "The Brexit factions reshaping UK politics". BBC News. Retrieved 15 September 2018. Sarah Wollaston, has joined the People's Vote campaign along with Phillip Lee and Guto Bebb