Proprioception

Proprioception (/ˌprpriˈsɛpʃən, -priə-/[1][2] PROH-pree-o-SEP-shən), also referred to as kinaesthesia (or kinesthesia), is the sense of self-movement, force, and body position.[3][4] It is sometimes described as the "sixth sense".[5]

Schematics and images of limb proprioceptors in mammals and insects[clarification needed]

Proprioception is mediated by proprioceptors, mechanosensory neurons located within muscles, tendons, and joints.[3] Most animals possess multiple subtypes of proprioceptors, which detect distinct kinematic parameters, such as joint position, movement, and load. Although all mobile animals possess proprioceptors, the structure of the sensory organs can vary across species.

Proprioceptive signals are transmitted to the central nervous system, where they are integrated with information from other sensory systems, such as the visual system and the vestibular system, to create an overall representation of body position, movement, and acceleration. In many animals, sensory feedback from proprioceptors is essential for stabilizing body posture and coordinating body movement.


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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Proprioception, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.