Provinces of China

Provincial-level administrative divisions (simplified Chinese: 省级行政区; traditional Chinese: 省級行政區; pinyin: Shěng-jí xíngzhèngqū) or first-level administrative divisions (simplified Chinese: 一级行政区; traditional Chinese: 一級行政區; pinyin: yī-jí xíngzhèngqū), are the highest-level Chinese administrative divisions. There are 34 such divisions claimed by the People's Republic of China, classified as 23 provinces (Chinese: ; pinyin: shěng), four municipalities, five autonomous regions, and two Special Administrative Regions. The political status of Taiwan Province along with a small fraction of Fujian Province remain in dispute, those are under separate rule by the Republic of China, which is usually referred to as "Taiwan".

Province-level administrative divisions
  • Also known as:
  • administrative divisions
CategoryUnitary one-party socialist republic (PRC)
Unitary semi-presidential system
Location People's Republic of China
 Republic of China (Taiwan)[1]
Created
NumberPRC:
31 (Direct Jurisdiction) + 2 (Special Administrative Regions) + 1 (Disputed)
ROC:
22 (Direct jurisdiction + 2 (Streamlined) + 48 (Claimed areas)
Populations552,300 (Macau) – 104,303,132 (Guangdong)
Areas30.4 km2 (11.7 sq mi) (Macau)[2] – 1,664,897 km2 (642,820 sq mi) (Xinjiang)[3]
Government
Subdivisions
province-level administrative divisions
Chinese name
Simplified Chinese省级行政区
Traditional Chinese省級行政區
province
Chinese
Tibetan name
Tibetanཞིང་ཆེན།
Zhuang name
ZhuangSwngj
Mongolian name
Mongolian scriptᠮᠤᠵᠢ
Uyghur name
Uyghurئۆلكە
Manchu name
Manchu scriptᡤᠣᠯᠣ
Romanizationgolo

Every province on mainland China (including the island province of Hainan) has a Communist Party of China provincial committee (Chinese: 省委; pinyin: shěngwěi), headed by a secretary (simplified Chinese: 书记; traditional Chinese: 書記; pinyin: shūjì). The Committee Secretary is effectively in charge of the province, rather than the governor of the provincial government.[4]