Robert Browning

Robert Browning (7 May 1812 – 12 December 1889) was an English poet and playwright whose dramatic monologues put him high among the Victorian poets. His verse was noted for irony, characterization, dark humour, social commentary, historical settings and challenging vocabulary and syntax. His career began well – the long poems Pauline (1833) and Paracelsus (1835) were acclaimed – but his reputation shrank for a time – his 1840 poem Sordello was seen as wilfully obscure – and took over a decade to recover, by which time he had changed from Shelleyan forms to a more personal style. In 1846 Browning married the older poet Elizabeth Barrett and moved to Italy. By her death in 1861 he had published the collection Men and Women (1855). His Dramatis Personae (1864) and book-length epic poem The Ring and the Book (1868–1869) made him a leading poet. He remained prolific, but his reputation today rests mainly on his middle period. By his death in 1889 he was seen as a sage and philosopher-poet who had fed into Victorian social and political discourse. Societies for studying his work survived in Britain and the US into the 20th century.

Robert Browning
Browning, c.1888
Born(1812-05-07)7 May 1812
Camberwell, London, England
Died12 December 1889(1889-12-12) (aged 77)
Venice, Kingdom of Italy
Resting placeWestminster Abbey
OccupationPoet
Alma materUniversity College London
Literary movementVictorian
Notable works"The Pied Piper of Hamelin", Men and Women, The Ring and the Book, Dramatis Personae, Dramatic Lyrics, Dramatic Romances and Lyrics, Asolando
Spouse
(m. 1846; died 1861)
ChildrenRobert Wiedeman Barrett "Pen" Browning[1]
RelativesRobert Browning (Father); Sarah Anna Wiedemann (Mother)
Signature