Ruud Lubbers

Rudolphus Franciscus Marie "Ruud" Lubbers (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈryt ˈlʏbərs] (listen); 7 May 1939 – 14 February 2018) was a Dutch politician and diplomat of the Catholic People's Party (KVP) that merged to become the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) party and businessman who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 4 November 1982 to 22 August 1994, and as United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1 January 2001 until 20 February 2005.[1]


Ruud Lubbers
Ruud Lubbers in 1985
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
In office
4 November 1982  22 August 1994
MonarchBeatrix
Deputy
See list
Preceded byDries van Agt
Succeeded byWim Kok
United Nations High
Commissioner for Refugees
In office
1 January 2001  20 February 2005
Secretary-GeneralKofi Annan
Preceded bySadako Ogata
Succeeded byAntónio Guterres
Leader of the Christian
Democratic Appeal
In office
25 October 1982  29 January 1994
Preceded byDries van Agt
Succeeded byElco Brinkman
Minister for Netherlands
Antilles and Aruba Affairs
In office
27 May 1994  22 August 1994
Prime MinisterHimself
Preceded byErnst Hirsch Ballin
Succeeded byJoris Voorhoeve
In office
7 November 1989  14 November 1989
Ad interim
Prime MinisterHimself
Preceded byJan de Koning
Succeeded byErnst Hirsch Ballin
Parliamentary leader in the
House of Representatives
In office
14 September 1989  7 November 1989
Preceded byBert de Vries
Succeeded byElco Brinkman
In office
3 June 1986  14 July 1986
Preceded byBert de Vries
Succeeded byBert de Vries
In office
24 Augustus 1981  4 November 1982
Preceded byDries van Agt
Succeeded byBert de Vries
In office
7 November 1978  10 June 1981
Preceded byWillem Aantjes
Succeeded byDries van Agt
Parliamentary groupChristian Democratic Appeal
Member of the House
of Representatives
In office
14 September 1989  7 November 1989
In office
3 June 1986  14 July 1986
In office
22 December 1977  4 November 1982
In office
8 June 1977  8 September 1977
Parliamentary groupChristian Democratic Appeal
(1980–1989)
Catholic People's Party
(1977–1980)
Minister of Economic Affairs
In office
11 May 1973  19 December 1977
Prime MinisterJoop den Uyl
Preceded byHarrie Langman
Succeeded byGijs van Aardenne
Personal details
Born
Rudolphus Franciscus Marie Lubbers

(1939-05-07)7 May 1939
Rotterdam, Netherlands
Died14 February 2018(2018-02-14) (aged 78)
Rotterdam, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyChristian Democratic Appeal (from 1980)
Other political
affiliations
Catholic People's Party (1964–1980)
Spouse(s)
Ria Hoogeweegen
(m. 1962)
Children3
Alma materRotterdam School of Economics
(BEc, M.Econ)
OccupationPolitician · Diplomat · Economist · Businessperson · Corporate director · Nonprofit director · Conservationist · Lobbyist · Activist · professor
Signature
Military service
Allegiance Netherlands
Branch/service Royal Netherlands Air Force
Years of service1962–1963 (Conscription)
1963–1969 (Reserve)
Rank Second lieutenant
Battles/warsCold War

Lubbers studied Economics at the Rotterdam School of Economics obtaining a Master of Economics degree and worked as a corporate director for the manufacturing company Hollandia in Rotterdam from April 1963 until May 1973 and as trade association executive for the Christian Employers' Association (NCW) from January 1965 until May 1973. After the election of 1972 Lubbers was appointed as Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Den Uyl taking office on 11 May 1973. Lubbers was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives after the election of 1977 serving from 8 June 1977 until 8 September 1977. Following the cabinet formation of 1977 Lubbers was asked to become Minister of Housing and Spatial Planning in the new cabinet but declined and returned as a Member of the House of Representatives on 22 December 1977, serving as a frontbencher and spokesperson for Economic Affairs. Following the resignation of Parliamentary leader Willem Aantjes Lubbers was selected as his successor taking office on 7 November 1978.

Shortly after the election of 1981 incumbent Prime Minister and Leader Dries van Agt unexpectedly announced he was stepping down and Lubbers was anonymously selected as his successor as Leader and the de facto next Prime Minister. Following cabinet formation of 1982 Lubbers formed the Cabinet Lubbers I and became Prime Minister of the Netherlands taking office on 4 November 1982. For the election of 1986 Lubbers served as Lijsttrekker (top candidate) and after a cabinet formation formed the Cabinet Lubbers II and continued as Prime Minister for a second term. For the election of 1989 Lubbers again served as Lijsttrekker and following another successful cabinet formation formed the Cabinet Lubbers III and continued as Prime Minister for a third term. In October 1993 Lubbers announced he was stepping down as Leader, and that he would not stand at the election of 1994 or serve another term as Prime Minister. He left office at the installation of the Cabinet Kok I on 22 August 1994.

Lubbers semi-retired from active politics and became active in the public sector as a non-profit director and served on several state commissions and councils on behalf of the government, he also served as a distinguished visiting professor of international relations and globalization at the Tilburg University and the John F. Kennedy School of Government of the Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts from February 1995 until December 2000. In November 2000 Lubbers was nominated as the next United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees serving from 1 January 2001 until 20 February 2005. Following his retirement Lubbers continued to be active public sector and worked as an advocate, lobbyist and activist for humanitarian, conservation, cnvironmentalism, sustainable development and climate change issues.

Lubbers was known for his abilities as a team leader and consensus builder. During his premiership, his cabinets were responsible for major reforms to social security, stimulating privatization and sustainable development, revitalizing the economy following the recession in the 1980s and reducing the deficit. Lubbers was granted the honorary title of Minister of State on 31 January 1995 and continued to comment on political affairs as a statesman until his death at the age of 78. He is both the youngest Prime Minister of the Netherlands at 43 years, and the longest-serving with 11 years, 291 days, and is consistently ranked both by scholars and the public as one of the best Prime Ministers after World War II.[2][3]