Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander

Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander (January 2, 1898 – November 1, 1989), was an American lawyer who was the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. in economics in the United States (1921), and the first woman to receive a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She was the first African-American woman to practice law in Pennsylvania, following in her father's footsteps.[1] She was the first national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, serving from 1919 to 1923.[2][3]

Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander
Sadie Tanner Mossell receiving PhD at the University of Pennsylvania
Born
Sadie Tanner Mossell

(1898-01-02)January 2, 1898
DiedNovember 1, 1989(1989-11-01) (aged 91)
Alma materUniversity of Pennsylvania
OccupationLawyer; first national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated; Civil Rights activist
Spouse(s)Raymond Pace Alexander
ChildrenMary Elizabeth Alexander
Rae Pace Alexander
Parent(s)Aaron Albert Mossell II
Mary Louisa Tanner

In 1946 she was appointed to the President's Committee on Civil Rights established by Harry Truman. She was the first African-American woman appointed as Assistant City Solicitor for the City of Philadelphia. She and her husband were both active in civil rights. In 1952 she was appointed to the city's Commission on Human Relations, serving through 1968. She was President of John F. Kennedy Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (1963). In 1979, Jimmy Carter appointed her as chair of the White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA). She served on the board of the National Urban League for 25 years.[4]