Schwerin

Schwerin (UK: /ʃvɛˈrn/, US: /ʃvˈrn/, German: [ʃveˈʁiːn] (listen); Mecklenburgian Low German: Swerin; Latin: Suerina, Suerinum) is the capital and second-largest city of the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern as well as of the region of Mecklenburg, after Rostock. It has around 96,000 inhabitants, and is thus the least populous of all German state capitals.

Schwerin
Location of Schwerin
Schwerin
Schwerin
Coordinates: 53°38′0″N 11°25′0″E
CountryGermany
StateMecklenburg-Western Pomerania
DistrictUrban district
Subdivisions18 boroughs
Government
  Lord mayor (201623) Rico Badenschier[1] (SPD)
Area
  Total130.46 km2 (50.37 sq mi)
Elevation
38 m (125 ft)
Population
 (2020-12-31)[2]
  Total95,609
  Density730/km2 (1,900/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
Postal codes
19053, 19055, 19057, 19059, 19061, 19063
Dialling codes0385
Vehicle registrationSN
Websiteschwerin.de
County of Schwerin
Grafschaft Schwerin
1161–1358
Coat of arms
County of Schwerin during the time of the Hohenstaufen Emperors (circa 1250)
StatusCounty
CapitalSchwerin
GovernmentCounty
Historical eraMiddle Ages
 Established
1161
 Partitioned to Schwerin
    and Schwerin-Wittenburg
 
1279
 Partitioned to create
    Schwerin-Boizenburg
 
1323
 Inherited Tecklenburg
1328
 Schwerin-Schwerin comital line
    extinct
 
1344
 Schwerin-Wittenburg-Boizenburg extinct
1349 1358
 Comital line extinct; sold
    to Mecklenburg-Schwerin
 
1358
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Duchy of Saxony
Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
Bistum Schwerin
1165–1648
Bishopric of Schwerin during the time of the Hohenstaufen Emperors (circa 1250)
StatusPrince-Bishopric
CapitalSchwerin
GovernmentPrince-Bishopric
Historical eraMiddle Ages
 Established
1062
1165
1648
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Duchy of Saxony
Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin

Schwerin is located on the southwestern shore of Lake Schwerin (German:Schweriner See), one of the largest lakes of the Mecklenburg Lake Plateau, and there are eleven other lakes within its city limits. The city is surrounded by the district of Northwestern Mecklenburg to the north, and the district of Ludwigslust-Parchim to the south. Schwerin lies in the east of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region. The name of the city is of Slavic origin, deriving from the root zvěŕ (wild animal) or zvěŕin (game reserve, animal garden, stud farm).

Schwerin was first mentioned in 1018 as Zuarina and was granted city rights in 1160 by Henry the Lion, thus it is the oldest city of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. From 1379 to 1815, the city was, as main residence of the House of Mecklenburg, the capital of the Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, and from 1815, when the duke was elevated to the title of a grand duke, to 1918, the capital of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The city is known for the romantic Schwerin Palace with its characteristic golden dome and its Niklot statue, that is situated on an island in Lake Schwerin. The dukes and grand dukes of Mecklenburg-Schwerin ruled from there, and since 1990, the palace is the official seat of the state parliament of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. The city also has a largely intact old town, thanks to only minor damage in World War II.

Major industries and employers include high technology, machine building, healthcare, government agencies, railway supply, consumer goods and tourism. Schwerin has three academic colleges, the FHM, HdBA and the Design School.