Script (Unicode)

In Unicode, a script is a collection of letters and other written signs used to represent textual information in one or more writing systems.[1] Some scripts support one and only one writing system and language, for example, Armenian. Other scripts support many different writing systems; for example, the Latin script supports English, French, German, Italian, Vietnamese, Latin itself, and several other languages. Some languages make use of multiple alternate writing systems and thus also use several scripts; for example, in Turkish, the Arabic script was used before the 20th century but transitioned to Latin in the early part of the 20th century. For a list of languages supported by each script, see the list of languages by writing system. More or less complementary to scripts are symbols and Unicode control characters.

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The unified diacritical characters and unified punctuation characters frequently have the "common" or "inherited" script property. However, the individual scripts often have their own punctuation and diacritics, so that many scripts include not only letters but also diacritic and other marks, punctuation, numerals and even their own idiosyncratic symbols and space characters.

Unicode 14.0 defines 159 separate scripts, including 93 modern scripts and 66 ancient or historic scripts.[2][3] More scripts are in the process for encoding or have been tentatively allocated for encoding in roadmaps.[4]


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